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Kopfkino

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Kopfkino last won the day on 1 May 2020

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  1. But all of this is just ‘what’s the downside risk for the government’ and absolutely zero of what Labour can actually offer. What the Labour Party was a master at under Miliband was pointing and going look at them they’re bad, we’ll be less bad. Under Corbyn it was look at them, they’re awful awful people, have some free stuff but at least there was some sort of vision even if credibility was questionable. Under Starmer, its back to look at them they’re bad, we’ll be less bad. Idc what crisis is happening, what lame excuses people want to make about not doing politics in a national
  2. Yeah i don’t know how people have got so excited by it. Good technique but he had an open goal and if Pope hadn’t decided to go walkabouts, he’d have saved it easily. To me a ‘stunning’ goal needs not to rely on a big mistake
  3. The acceptability of it will probably be down to whatever narrative the Conservative Party wants to spin. Ever since Attlee, they’ve tended to be able to set the narrative on this sort of stuff and to seize that narrative away from them takes boldness and good strategy (I really think Corbyn Labour is underrated on this even if Brexit played as big a role in dragging Cons left) which Labour’s Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum don’t look capable of atm. That people just freely accept the necessity of this accumulation but Labour never managed to show the necessity of doing the same in 2008 is sort of
  4. Yes tbf, it’s entirely possible he didn’t ‘win the argument’ but appeared to ‘win the argument’ because Brexit drove the Conservatives down a different path and 2017 was more a reflection May and her disastrous election campaign. But I always saw Corbynism as mainly driven by economics even if the man himself was only bothered by cranky foreign policy, and the politics of the UK right now favour a lean towards Corbynomics, though as I said, it needs professionalising. The voters that Labour needs to win back (ex-Labour voters that moved straight to the Cons or went via UKIP) are pr
  5. If I ever see Sean Dyche complain about soft decisions again I will spontaneously combust
  6. Plenty in this for us, play a bit quicker and crisper and they’re not all that solid. Problem is they’re out-Burnleying themselves and we look vulnerable anytime the ball is in the air
  7. Terrible mistake but shouldn’t have been able to make the mistake cos just before Mendy had turned and had space to run into but passed it back to Amartey. In fact, has Mendy passed it forward yet
  8. Why are we still pretending Choudhury is a Premier League footballer
  9. What do they need to get away from? Okay yeah they need to stop being scared of the Union Jack and waving Palestinian flags at conference, dial down the social progressivism for progressivism’s sake cos the activists are bored on a Sunday, and professionalise it all a bit more but actually the main cut-and-thrust of Corbynism is exactly what they should be banging on about still. All it needs is a more respectable messenger and a better narrative, Corbyn did the hard work of ‘winning the argument’. It’s hard to disentangle how much of it was Labour’s doing and how much of it was ju
  10. If the Conservatives winning a majority of 21, down from 102 in ‘92 was a bad defeat, what is the Conservatives winning a majority of 80, up from no majority? You’re comparing chalk and cheese there. And of course, post 92 the thing that did for the Conservatives beyond repair was the ERM. I’m not naive enough to think some similar, huge, flash event is beyond the realms of possibility this time around. Heck 2017 shows how things can swing pretty quickly. Black Wednesday was particularly punishing because it related to an issue that was so central to the government. Sure, maybe Brexit co
  11. Idk if he’s capable of making an impact in the Premier League but it can’t be a bad idea to throw him in when everyone else looks knackered or off it. Yeah Smith Rowe has far more first team experience but we saw the difference that throwing him made to Arsenal around Christmas. Just something a bit different
  12. Funny that, the bloke that actually had all the information to hand was better placed to make the choice over a load of people who had basically none
  13. Just get some energy into the team. It’s Burnley, we don’t need to be technically perfect but we do need legs. Tell Choudhury and Albrighton to run around like headless chickens, get Tavares in for the enthusiasm of youth
  14. You find me another club anywhere in Europe with our relative resources that could assemble a squad to sustain the injuries we have had, the extra games we’ve had to play and still be fighting right at the top of the league. We can all sit on here pretending our opinion is important completely removed from the day to day task of managing a football club at both board level and coaching level and pretend the players are robots that don’t suffer from fatigue Im sure everyone on here knows the areas we need to improve on, I’m sure everyone at the club does too. What in an ideal world we
  15. Well I’d happily say it is an excuse for sub-par performances. Having that excuse doesn’t change the fact you have to find a way through and still get the job done but it clearly is a factor. If you don’t think that the number of injuries, almost on a conveyor belt, players playing when they’re not fully fit, players being rushed back, the same players having to play the sheer number of minutes in a short space of time isn’t a significant factor in being a bit lacklustre, then you’re simply wrong. Ultimately, you have to turn up on the day with whatever hand you have but today was rid
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