Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
yorkie1999

Also in the news

Recommended Posts

36 minutes ago, Countryfox said:

"They'll never spot this Don Pablo !!"

 

lollollol ...    thick as fookin mince !!!

 

 

 

 

IMG_2431.jpg

If he was clever he’d start wearing a Burqa. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 15/07/2019 at 14:50, Finnegan said:

 

I have a feeling it might have been on Facebook I don't think he signed up on here, I could be wrong though my memory is appalling. But Mablo definitely got under his skin yeah. 

 

Sheehan was a bit of an in joke on here largely because of Thracian.

 

Thracian used to have a habit of convincing himself that all of our academy players were future world cup winners and we should play them more often. He'd act like he'd personally scouted them all and was some youth football expert.

 

The abuse of Sheehan (and Louis "best finisher at the club" Dodds) was less really abuse of Sheehan and more just banter between Thracian and what he called the "Swan Lestas", an alleged clique of Foxestalk piss takers that were very active on here circa 03/04/05.

 

But I guess if you're a young footballer in the early days of social media and forums and you're googling yourself and reading all that constant abuse its probably easy to take it personally. Think he's the only one that ever bit. 

 

A long story with many amusing factors but I’ll keep it briefish lol 

 

But yes I got a series of my very own private message on Facebook from Mr Sheehan who quite depressingly took the time to work who I was by joining up the dots between pictures uploaded both on here and on Facebook. In which he called me overweight (not that it matters but I wasn’t as finners will attest  ? ) a **** and  a challenge to come and say what id been saying about him online to his face next time I saw him out in Leicester. And the only thing I’d said about him on here that wasn’t obviously satire was he wasn’t good enough defensively to play at championship level (and low and behold he’s spent his entire career playing below championship level because he’s not good enough defensively) As said anything else was more directed at Thracian. Literally two weeks after I saw him at a pre season game against Hinckley (he was in crowd as he’d just moved to Leeds) got some awkward stares ?.

 

But yeah the guy had a series problem with me. If you watch the highlights of our 4-1 win over Watford around 07 he scores a peach of a free kick and he’s celebration was to run in front of the kop and give the old Italian fist over elbow and to this today I’m convinced that was for my benefit as I’d seriously stuck the boot in about his performance the week before  (in one of the many amusing factors in this saga he scored in the second half and id actually been kicked out of the ground at half time as apparently as the steward put itI was being “made an example of” for persistent standing)

 

in retaliation I sent him a torrent of abuse when we won the league and mocked him about his career panning out exactly as I said it would and then blocked him lol 

 

Pretty funny all in all. I have no problem with him and I’m sure he’s grownup enough now to not care about what people say about him online 

 

Bizarre period 06 - 08 had 3/4 weird encounters with footballers/managers including an argument with Dennis wise and spotting Ivan De La Pena in an Italian in Ashby. Nothing like that happens anymore lol 

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a DM once from someone who sounded mildly threatening under the guise of being friendly.

I laughed it off rather than alerting the mods.

Life's too short to worry about strange people and their odd ways.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Manwell Pablo said:

... the guy had a series problem with me. If you watch the highlights of our 4-1 win over Watford around 07 he scores a peach of a free kick and he’s celebration was to run in front of the kop and give the old Italian fist over elbow and to this today I’m convinced that was for my benefit as I’d seriously stuck the boot in about his performance the week before  (in one of the many amusing factors in this saga he scored in the second half and id actually been kicked out of the ground at half time as apparently as the steward put itI was being “made an example of” for persistent standing)

Fun fact of the day for that match in 2007 - Sheehan's goal was a deflection. So, technically you could say it wasn't even his goal. lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Big win for those seeking to prevent our new PM suspending democracy - yes, suspending democracy, not "proroguing parliament" - so as to force through No Deal: 

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/brexit-vote-result-no-deal-commons-boris-johnson-prorogue-amendment-a9010606.html

 

If Boris or Hunt want to push through No Deal, they'll now have to face debates and votes in parliament.

 

1 minister resigned (Margot James) & 4 cabinet ministers abstained (Hammond, Stewart, Gauke & Clark).

Only 1 Labour MP voted with the Govt (Hoey) & a handful abstained.

 

Where does Boris (?) go from here with his promise to leave the EU by 31st October, do or die?

General election in Sept/Oct? Back down and face the fury of the ERG/Brexit Party? I cannot see the EU making the concessions the hardliners want or negotiating a new deal before then....am I wrong?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Alf Bentley said:

Big win for those seeking to prevent our new PM suspending democracy - yes, suspending democracy, not "proroguing parliament" - so as to force through No Deal: 

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/brexit-vote-result-no-deal-commons-boris-johnson-prorogue-amendment-a9010606.html

 

If Boris or Hunt want to push through No Deal, they'll now have to face debates and votes in parliament.

 

1 minister resigned (Margot James) & 4 cabinet ministers abstained (Hammond, Stewart, Gauke & Clark).

Only 1 Labour MP voted with the Govt (Hoey) & a handful abstained.

 

Where does Boris (?) go from here with his promise to leave the EU by 31st October, do or die?

General election in Sept/Oct? Back down and face the fury of the ERG/Brexit Party? I cannot see the EU making the concessions the hardliners want or negotiating a new deal before then....am I wrong?

Not sure how it matters tbh. If MP's vote against no deal, there's nothing forcing the eu to grant another extension. Then it's either leave with no deal, or revoke article 50. It's one thing, probably a good thing, for MP's to block no deal, it's an entirely different and very dangerous thing to just revoke article 50 imo. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Innovindil said:

Not sure how it matters tbh. If MP's vote against no deal, there's nothing forcing the eu to grant another extension. Then it's either leave with no deal, or revoke article 50. It's one thing, probably a good thing, for MP's to block no deal, it's an entirely different and very dangerous thing to just revoke article 50 imo. 

 

How it matters is that it prevents the new PM suspending democracy to force through No Deal without parliamentary debate/vote. Pretty important for democracy not to be suspended, I think.

 

I agree it doesn't prevent No Deal or guarantee an extension (which the PM would have to request & EU would have to approve - for a good reason).

I also agree that revoking should be avoided if at all possible, as it would cause justified democratic outrage & potential public disorder.

 

But parliament will now have a say in the final stages, if we're heading for No Deal. It might end up allowing No Deal to proceed. But it might find a way of blocking it, even if that means somehow forcing the PM to request an extension or to revoke.

Or it might trigger a confidence vote and general election, which might not have succeeded at an earlier stage. Who knows?

 

But how does Boris proceed now (assuming he's PM)?

- Call an early election to get a pro-No Deal majority?

- Believe that he can out-manoeuvre parliament to get No Deal through?

- Backslide, get a few token concessions from the EU & declare it a new deal better than May's, hoping to fool his hardliners?

- Believe he can get a genuinely new deal from the EU to satisfy the ERG (the least likely outcome, I'd say)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Alf Bentley said:

 

How it matters is that it prevents the new PM suspending democracy to force through No Deal without parliamentary debate/vote. Pretty important for democracy not to be suspended, I think.

 

I agree it doesn't prevent No Deal or guarantee an extension (which the PM would have to request & EU would have to approve - for a good reason).

I also agree that revoking should be avoided if at all possible, as it would cause justified democratic outrage & potential public disorder.

 

But parliament will now have a say in the final stages, if we're heading for No Deal. It might end up allowing No Deal to proceed. But it might find a way of blocking it, even if that means somehow forcing the PM to request an extension or to revoke.

Or it might trigger a confidence vote and general election, which might not have succeeded at an earlier stage. Who knows?

 

But how does Boris proceed now (assuming he's PM)?

- Call an early election to get a pro-No Deal majority?

- Believe that he can out-manoeuvre parliament to get No Deal through?

- Backslide, get a few token concessions from the EU & declare it a new deal better than May's, hoping to fool his hardliners?

- Believe he can get a genuinely new deal from the EU to satisfy the ERG (the least likely outcome, I'd say)

I’m pleased that it’s been stopped, it shouldn’t have been a consideration or even a possibility to suspend parliament over this.

This doesn’t make no deal impossible but at least it stops being enforced in a undemocratic way. Hopefully we can have an election or referendum to end the deadlock and remove uncertainty, it’s not good for the sanity of some.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, UpTheLeagueFox said:

I had a DM once from someone who sounded mildly threatening under the guise of being friendly.

I laughed it off rather than alerting the mods.

Life's too short to worry about strange people and their odd ways.

 

If I ever meet you in person my mates and I are going to duff you up for Iwan Roberts phone number. 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Finnegan said:

If I ever meet you in person my mates and I are going to duff you up for Iwan Roberts phone number. 

Haha

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It has been interesting to me that both Hunt and Johnson have recently hardened their stance on their EU negotiating strategy, and I genuinely believe the EU have started to become more concerned about the prospect of a no deal outcome. Now I'm no fan of shutting the doors to Parliament, and  I doubt that would ever have happened, but has this once again demonstrated to the EU that Parliament will go through hell and high water to prevent a no deal and weakened our negotiating stance, or does it nake no difference as the PM would have to request an extension to the 31st, and as it looks like Boris wins he has been absolutely adamant that there will be no such request.

Edited by The Guvnor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Alf Bentley said:

 

How it matters is that it prevents the new PM suspending democracy to force through No Deal without parliamentary debate/vote. Pretty important for democracy not to be suspended, I think.

 

I agree it doesn't prevent No Deal or guarantee an extension (which the PM would have to request & EU would have to approve - for a good reason).

I also agree that revoking should be avoided if at all possible, as it would cause justified democratic outrage & potential public disorder.

 

But parliament will now have a say in the final stages, if we're heading for No Deal. It might end up allowing No Deal to proceed. But it might find a way of blocking it, even if that means somehow forcing the PM to request an extension or to revoke.

Or it might trigger a confidence vote and general election, which might not have succeeded at an earlier stage. Who knows?

 

But how does Boris proceed now (assuming he's PM)?

- Call an early election to get a pro-No Deal majority?

- Believe that he can out-manoeuvre parliament to get No Deal through?

- Backslide, get a few token concessions from the EU & declare it a new deal better than May's, hoping to fool his hardliners?

- Believe he can get a genuinely new deal from the EU to satisfy the ERG (the least likely outcome, I'd say)

Yeah I get that, my first line came across a bit cavalier when it was meant as I don't think it matters to the end result. Of course it matters that democracy won't be suspended. 

 

No way Boris gets any concessions I would think, they've said loud and often the deal on offer is THE deal. I highly doubt he'd call a general election either, as it stands brexit party would slam the tories, possibly even to the point of it being a tory/BP coalition. 

 

If I had to guess, he'll take a page out of jezza's book and fence sit. If he smuggles no deal through, he's done what he said he'd do, if parliament block it, it's someone else's fault. 

 

The worst thing about all this is I genuinely believe these years of uncertainty and having businesses jump through hoops for each of these new deadlines is probably worse than no deal long term. At least then you could say we're going with conviction instead of all this flip flopping. 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Strokes said:

I’m pleased that it’s been stopped, it shouldn’t have been a consideration or even a possibility to suspend parliament over this.

This doesn’t make no deal impossible but at least it stops being enforced in a undemocratic way. Hopefully we can have an election or referendum to end the deadlock and remove uncertainty, it’s not good for the sanity of some.

 

Completely agree - including the bit about sanity. I've honestly never felt remotely as unhappy about the state of my country, about the prospects for a stable, peaceful future here and about what sort of country my daughter will inherit.

If I didn't have her, I would genuinely be looking to leave the UK. I've never said that before and never anticipated saying it or doing it - and I'm almost 57.

 

Personally, I find the prospects of No Deal alarming - not so much the inevitable initial mayhem, more what happens in the aftermath: major damage to a lot of individual lives, communities, social fabric, international reputation, relations between ordinary people on the ground....and I'm not even one of those particularly vulnerable to potential impact, apart from via my daughter.

 

I'm aware that last paragraph is controversial in that some people don't believe the experts and think No Deal would be fine - not an argument that I want to get into.

But surely the very least that needs to happen is for there to be a proper mandate from the electorate for No Deal - via election or referendum? I'd hate it if that mandate was achieved, but would hate it even more - and fear the consequences more - if it happened without any proper mandate.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Alf Bentley said:

 

Completely agree - including the bit about sanity. I've honestly never felt remotely as unhappy about the state of my country, about the prospects for a stable, peaceful future here and about what sort of country my daughter will inherit.

If I didn't have her, I would genuinely be looking to leave the UK. I've never said that before and never anticipated saying it or doing it - and I'm almost 57.

 

Personally, I find the prospects of No Deal alarming - not so much the inevitable initial mayhem, more what happens in the aftermath: major damage to a lot of individual lives, communities, social fabric, international reputation, relations between ordinary people on the ground....and I'm not even one of those particularly vulnerable to potential impact, apart from via my daughter.

 

I'm aware that last paragraph is controversial in that some people don't believe the experts and think No Deal would be fine - not an argument that I want to get into.

But surely the very least that needs to happen is for there to be a proper mandate from the electorate for No Deal - via election or referendum? I'd hate it if that mandate was achieved, but would hate it even more - and fear the consequences more - if it happened without any proper mandate.

I agree there is no particular mandate for no deal but nor is there for any particular type of brexit. I don’t fear a no deal per se but crashing into it with no structure or planning would be a disaster. To be honest I’d rather we just accepted the deal and moved on as a country because the domination of this debate is exhausting, it doesn’t look like anybody will get exactly what they want or envisaged. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Strokes said:

I agree there is no particular mandate for no deal but nor is there for any particular type of brexit. I don’t fear a no deal per se but crashing into it with no structure or planning would be a disaster. To be honest I’d rather we just accepted the deal and moved on as a country because the domination of this debate is exhausting, it doesn’t look like anybody will get exactly what they want or envisaged. 

 

 

Yep. With hindsight, it would have been good if the original legislation had ordered a second referendum once terms were negotiated - with a No Deal option, if need be, as well as Deal & Remain options.

The other alternative would have been for the Leave outcome to be clearly specified....but that was probably impossible. Even if there had been agreement on the Leave side, terms had to be negotiated with the EU.

 

I'm still inclined to blame Cameron for this mess, more than Boris, Farage, Corbyn or ERG, much as I have no time for any of the latter.

 

I don't know, maybe I'm just getting more anxious/pessimistic with age, but I don't think so. I think my concern is based on rational analysis - and where we could be heading, if we fvck this up, really does concern me.

Who'd have thought, a couple of year ago, that we'd be debating the suspension of democracy & would be awaiting potentially the biggest loose cannon ever as PM?

And that's all before any inadequately prepared No Deal even happens, with all the conceivable impacts on lots of lives, relationships, attitudes, snowball effect..... I seriously worry for the future stability of the nation if a rash outcome occurs.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No-deal Brexit would plunge Britain into a recession, says OBR

Office for Budget Responsibility believes economy would shrink by 2% by end of 2020

 

A no-deal Brexit would plunge Britain into a recession that would shrink the economy by 2%, push unemployment above 5% and send house prices tumbling by around 10%, according to the government’s independent forecasting body.

In an assessment of the impact of Britain leaving the EU without a deal at the end of October, the Office for Budget Responsibility said the result would be a year-long downturn that would increase borrowing by £30bn a year.

The assessment prompted a fresh warning from the chancellor, Philip Hammond, to Brexiters calling for a “harder” exit from the EU.

 

“The report that the OBR have published this morning shows that even in the most benign version of a no-deal exit there would be a very significant hit to the UK economy, a very significant reduction in tax revenues and a big increase in our national debt – a recession caused by a no-deal Brexit,” Hammond said in a Reuters interview.

“But that most benign version is not the version that is being talked about by prominent Brexiteers. They are talking about a much harder version which would cause much more disruption to our economy and the OBR is clear that in that less benign version of no deal the hit would be much greater, the impact would be much harder, the recession would be bigger. So I greatly fear the impact on our economy and our public finances of the kind of no-deal Brexit that is realistically being discussed now.”

The OBR estimated that the recession – caused by the impact of increased uncertainty and falling confidence on investment and trade – would be as bad as that suffered in the 1990s but only a third as bad as the slump at the time of the financial crisis of the late 2000s.

In its fiscal risks report, the OBR said its assessment was “relatively benign” because it was based on the less gloomy of two scenarios produced by the International Monetary Fund earlier this year. A worst-case scenario sketched out by the Bank of England last November estimated that the economy could shrink by as much as 8% in an even deeper recession than that of 2008-09.

However, the OBR – established in 2010 to provide independent forecasts for growth and the public finances – said the outcome would be worse if a no-deal, no-transition Brexit also resulted in chaos at the border.

 

“A more disruptive or disorderly scenario could hit the public finances much harder,” the OBR added.

Even so, it said the shock of a no-deal departure would be enough to push the economy into recession in the fourth quarter of 2019. Gross domestic product – a measure of the economy’s output – would be 4% lower by the middle of 2021 than the OBR anticipated when it produced forecasts for Hammond’s spring statement.

Asset prices would also take a hit, with the watchdog pencilling in a 5% fall in share prices in the final three months of this year, a near-10% drop in house prices between the start of 2019 and mid-2021, a 20% fall in residential property transactions by the end of 2020 and an increase in annual public borrowing and the national debt.

The OBR said it was assuming that the Bank of England would seek to support the economy by cutting interest rates to about 0.2% by the end of 2020. Sterling would fall by 10% immediately – taking it to about $1.10 against the US dollar.

Speaking at a press conference to launch the report, the OBR chairman, Robert Chote, said: “The big picture is that heightened uncertainty and declining confidence deter investment, higher trade barriers with the EU weigh on domestic and foreign demand, while the pound and other asset prices fall sharply.

“These factors combine to push the economy into recession.”

Until now the OBR had been assuming there would be a smooth Brexit when coming up with its forecasts but it said the willingness of Boris Johnson and Jeremy Hunt to contemplate a no-deal departure meant it was stress-testing alternative scenarios.

 

Chote also warned Johnson and Hunt that the spending pledges made during their campaigns to be prime minister came at a cost. He said the two contenders to replace Theresa May had made a series of uncosted proposals for tax cuts and spending increases that would be likely to raise government borrowing by tens of billions of pounds. “There is no war chest that would make them a free lunch,” he said.

Nicky Morgan, the chair of the House of Commons Treasury committee, has written to the Treasury and the Bank of England asking for updated analysis of Brexit under different scenarios. “This will ensure that parliament is as informed as possible as it considers key decisions about the future of our country,” she said.

John McDonnell, Labour’s shadow chancellor, said: “It’s obvious the Conservative party constitutes a clear and present danger to the economy and the wellbeing of everyone in the UK.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Buce said:

No-deal Brexit would plunge Britain into a recession, says OBR

Office for Budget Responsibility believes economy would shrink by 2% by end of 2020

 

A no-deal Brexit would plunge Britain into a recession that would shrink the economy by 2%, push unemployment above 5% and send house prices tumbling by around 10%, according to the government’s independent forecasting body.

In an assessment of the impact of Britain leaving the EU without a deal at the end of October, the Office for Budget Responsibility said the result would be a year-long downturn that would increase borrowing by £30bn a year.

The assessment prompted a fresh warning from the chancellor, Philip Hammond, to Brexiters calling for a “harder” exit from the EU.

 

“The report that the OBR have published this morning shows that even in the most benign version of a no-deal exit there would be a very significant hit to the UK economy, a very significant reduction in tax revenues and a big increase in our national debt – a recession caused by a no-deal Brexit,” Hammond said in a Reuters interview.

“But that most benign version is not the version that is being talked about by prominent Brexiteers. They are talking about a much harder version which would cause much more disruption to our economy and the OBR is clear that in that less benign version of no deal the hit would be much greater, the impact would be much harder, the recession would be bigger. So I greatly fear the impact on our economy and our public finances of the kind of no-deal Brexit that is realistically being discussed now.”

The OBR estimated that the recession – caused by the impact of increased uncertainty and falling confidence on investment and trade – would be as bad as that suffered in the 1990s but only a third as bad as the slump at the time of the financial crisis of the late 2000s.

In its fiscal risks report, the OBR said its assessment was “relatively benign” because it was based on the less gloomy of two scenarios produced by the International Monetary Fund earlier this year. A worst-case scenario sketched out by the Bank of England last November estimated that the economy could shrink by as much as 8% in an even deeper recession than that of 2008-09.

However, the OBR – established in 2010 to provide independent forecasts for growth and the public finances – said the outcome would be worse if a no-deal, no-transition Brexit also resulted in chaos at the border.

 

“A more disruptive or disorderly scenario could hit the public finances much harder,” the OBR added.

Even so, it said the shock of a no-deal departure would be enough to push the economy into recession in the fourth quarter of 2019. Gross domestic product – a measure of the economy’s output – would be 4% lower by the middle of 2021 than the OBR anticipated when it produced forecasts for Hammond’s spring statement.

Asset prices would also take a hit, with the watchdog pencilling in a 5% fall in share prices in the final three months of this year, a near-10% drop in house prices between the start of 2019 and mid-2021, a 20% fall in residential property transactions by the end of 2020 and an increase in annual public borrowing and the national debt.

The OBR said it was assuming that the Bank of England would seek to support the economy by cutting interest rates to about 0.2% by the end of 2020. Sterling would fall by 10% immediately – taking it to about $1.10 against the US dollar.

Speaking at a press conference to launch the report, the OBR chairman, Robert Chote, said: “The big picture is that heightened uncertainty and declining confidence deter investment, higher trade barriers with the EU weigh on domestic and foreign demand, while the pound and other asset prices fall sharply.

“These factors combine to push the economy into recession.”

Until now the OBR had been assuming there would be a smooth Brexit when coming up with its forecasts but it said the willingness of Boris Johnson and Jeremy Hunt to contemplate a no-deal departure meant it was stress-testing alternative scenarios.

 

Chote also warned Johnson and Hunt that the spending pledges made during their campaigns to be prime minister came at a cost. He said the two contenders to replace Theresa May had made a series of uncosted proposals for tax cuts and spending increases that would be likely to raise government borrowing by tens of billions of pounds. “There is no war chest that would make them a free lunch,” he said.

Nicky Morgan, the chair of the House of Commons Treasury committee, has written to the Treasury and the Bank of England asking for updated analysis of Brexit under different scenarios. “This will ensure that parliament is as informed as possible as it considers key decisions about the future of our country,” she said.

John McDonnell, Labour’s shadow chancellor, said: “It’s obvious the Conservative party constitutes a clear and present danger to the economy and the wellbeing of everyone in the UK.”

It will all just be dismissed as project fear

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The EU and especially the French, Belgians and Spanish are going to stitch us up like a kipper in the event of a no-deal brexit and with this clown in charge we're gonna get well and truly shafted. I ain't bothered by the context of this photo, who stands there with a fish in his hand?

 

 

 

 

skynews-boris-johnson-tory_4721200.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is he just a liar or an incompetent liar?

Kipper rules Boris Johnson blamed on EU are actually British, says Brussels

 

Claims by Boris Johnson that regulations imposed by “Brussels bureaucrats” were damaging the trade in kippers have been debunked by the European commission, which said that the food safety obligations criticised by him were due to rules set by Britain.

Speaking during the final hustings of the Conservative party’s leadership contest on Wednesday night, Johnson held aloft a plastic-wrapped kipper that had come from a fish smoker on the Isle of Man, who he said was “utterly furious”.

“After decades of sending them through the post like this he has had his costs massively increased by Brussels bureaucrats who are insisting that each kipper must be accompanied by a plastic ice pillow,” said the MP, who added that it had been presented to him by the editor of a national newspaper.

“Pointless, pointless, expensive, environmentally damaging ‘elf and safety’,” Johnson added.

However, the European commission hit back against the claims on Thursday, pointing to British government advice, which stresses that foods that need refrigerating must be kept cool while they are being transported – potentially packed in an insulated box with a coolant gel or in a coolbag.

 

A spokesperson for the commission said that while traders had an obligation to meet microbiological requirements to ensure the safety of food, the sale of products from food businesses to consumers was not covered by EU legislation on food hygiene.

“The case described by Mr Johnson falls outside the scope of the EU legislation and it’s purely a UK national competence, so I hope this is clear and the rules must be checked with the national authorities,” a commission spokesperson said during a briefing to journalists on Thursday.

“There are strict rules when it comes to fish, but these kinds of rules do not apply to processed fishery products. I’m talking about the temperature case that he was explaining.”

To cheers and laughter from the party faithful during the hustings at the ExCel Centre in London, Johnson had appeared to riff on the political nickname for Ukip, once feared by Conservative leaders, telling the crowd: “We will bring the kippers back. It’s not a red herring.”

Earlier, he had said: “And when we come out therefore, we will not only be able to take back control of our regulatory framework and end this damaging regulatory overkill but we will also be able to do things to boost Britain’s economy, which leads the world in so many sectors.”

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Wymeswold fox said:

Why did the USA President thread get deleted?

 

some-people-are-using-their-mobile-phone

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where was the trolling? The 2 apologists might be tedious but as far as I can tell that's actually their view and it'd be weird to have a forum with a narrow viewset.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't get the deleting the thread. If people want to talk about a subject, they'll start it up again. If theres offensive posts, delete them, not the thread. If people are constantly breaking rules, ban or restrict their usage. Problem solved surely?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Eh. Its a decision the mods have made. Just accept it and move on, if you want to talk about Donald Trump there's thousands of forums, sub reddits, twitter. 

 

Can we not turn this thread in to a carbon copy of the same argument. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...