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King Brendan ...... ohhh how lucky we are

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3 hours ago, murphy said:

He has charisma, much like O'Neill has and I think that goes a long way in terms of motivation and man-management.

 

I think we are a great fit for each other at the moment but if he continues his success he will be off at the first sniff of a top job.

 

He is 100% going to get a top job, but this is a perfect job for him now And in reality it’s a top job as well , let’s hope we continue to do well This season and get into Europe and then he might stick around next summer 

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3 hours ago, murphy said:

He has charisma, much like O'Neill has and I think that goes a long way in terms of motivation and man-management.

 

I think we are a great fit for each other at the moment but if he continues his success he will be off at the first sniff of a top job.

 

He’s got a top job - we’re a big side now according to him and Maddison!!!

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31 minutes ago, Wolfox said:

He’s got a top job - we’re a big side now according to him and Maddison!!!

Well enjoy the ride Ben, but don't get too attached.  I don't want to see any tears!

 

Don't you think he looks a bit like Rob?

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1 minute ago, murphy said:

Well enjoy the ride Ben, but don't get too attached.  I don't want to see any tears!

 

Don't you think he looks a bit like Rob?

🤣 

 

The caped crusader!

 

One for the laydeez too (if the red tops are to be believed) 

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Didn't realise how short Rodgers is. He looks minuscule next to decent height people.

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I also think that Brendan will get on with Top and the other directors extremely well and he'll probably appreciate the support and setup off the pitch here - having seen the absolute shit-show goings on at the other 'big' clubs. 

 

As long as we're up there - I don't think he will walk at the first opportunity at all. 

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2 hours ago, LC/FC said:

https://theathletic.com/1253397/2019/10/01/a-british-coach-that-thrives-wherever-he-goes-why-do-we-look-down-our-noses-at-brendan-rodgers/

 

This one is definitely worth a share for those that don't have a sub. 

 

 

 

Is it safe to praise Brendan Rodgers yet? The question came to mind on Sunday evening while watching Leicester City humiliate Newcastle United with the type of swaggering performance his teams should be renowned for.

Arrogant, Rodgers would call it. “Football arrogance, not personal arrogance.”

It is the way his teams play. Swansea City swaggered their way into the Premier League and then, contrary to all expectations at the time, to a mid-table finish in the top flight. Liverpool swaggered their way to a Premier League title challenge nobody saw coming, falling agonisingly short in the final week of the season. Celtic swaggered their way to success in every domestic competition they entered during his time there, including a record-breaking, “invincible” Scottish Premiership title campaign.

As for Leicester, since his arrival at the end of February, they have swaggered their way to more points in the Premier League than any team apart from the runaway pair of Liverpool and Manchester City. They are now third in the table, and playing with the verve that has been the hallmark of every Rodgers team.

As The Athletic’s Michael Cox observed, they are not creating an enormous number of chances.

That swagger, though, is as unmistakable as it is familiar. From Ricardo Pereira and Ben Chilwell in the full-back positions, through Wilfred Ndidi, Youri Tielemans, Dennis Praet and James Maddison to a rejuvenated Jamie Vardy, Leicester are oozing the confidence — and, yes, the arrogance — to play fluent football on the front foot.

When it comes to Rodgers, though, there remains that strange desire to shift the conversation away from his coaching ability and on to the various negative tropes that cling to him: the notion that he merely profited from the solid foundations built by Kenny Jackett, Roberto Martinez and Paulo Sousa at Swansea; that he struck lucky with Luis Suarez at Liverpool, as was seen by the way results nosedived after the Uruguayan’s departure; that any half-decent coach could dominate Scottish football to the extent that he did at Celtic; that he has walked into a nice, easy gig at Leicester, with so many talented young players at his disposal.

What is it about Rodgers that makes people want to demean his record? Some don’t like the cut of his jib: the homespun wisdom and folksy turn of phrase, the evangelical zeal, the fact he dared to lose three stone and have his teeth whitened after turning 40. Joey Barton has rarely been as popular as when, having signed for Rangers, he mocked the then-Celtic manager — “the tan and the teeth and all that” — as being in the midst of a mid-life crisis.

At the age of 46, though, Rodgers is more than 500 games into a management career that warrants more respect and admiration than he ever seems to get.

So many of the negative appraisals surround his “failure” to lead Liverpool to the title in 2013-14. He bottled it, he blew a 3-0 goal lead at Crystal Palace and so on.

Looking back at Liverpool’s squad from that season — an unconvincing Simon Mignolet in goal, Glen Johnson at right-back, two from Martin Skrtel, Kolo Toure and Mamadou Sakho in central defence, Jon Flanagan edging out Aly Cissokho at left-back, Steven Gerrard trying to reinvent himself as a midfield anchorman at the age of 33, Jordan Henderson only beginning to come to terms with his surroundings, Philippe Coutinho and Raheem Sterling as raw youngsters aged 21 and 18 respectively, Daniel Sturridge and Suarez in attack — it really is hard to convince yourself that they “blew it” by finishing two points behind a Manchester City team with an all-star cast that included Vincent Kompany, Pablo Zabaleta, Yaya Toure, David Silva and Sergio Aguero.

They faltered from a leading position, but so did Arsene Wenger’s Arsenal, Jose Mourinho’s Chelsea and Manuel Pellegrini’s City themselves at various stages over that season. Liverpool looked relentless, riding on the crest of a wave, until Gerrard’s unfortunate slip against Chelsea at Anfield. A predictable drop-off followed the next season, but the suggestion that Rodgers’ temperament or coaching or tactics were their undoing in the 2013-14 race is, particularly with five years’ hindsight, a bizarre one.

The recurring theme of Rodgers’ career is that, whether as a psychologist or as a coach, he helps players scale unexpected heights. That was true of just about every member of that Liverpool squad six seasons ago — and that includes Suarez, who scored 15 goals in his first 44 Premier League appearances under Kenny Dalglish, and then 54 goals in his next 66 under Rodgers. Coutinho and Sterling were exciting talents but how many other managers, at a big club, would have indulged the pair of them through those early years to the extent that Rodgers did?

Everywhere he has been (with the exception of an unhappy, brief spell at Reading), Rodgers has empowered players to perform to a higher technical level than might have been imagined. At Swansea, he had Garry Monk, Alan Tate and Ashley Williams playing out from the back with a poise and a confidence that took them to mid-table in the Premier League.

Some will shrug at the mention of his unbeaten campaign at Celtic, or his back-to-back clean sweeps of Scottish domestic trophies — and perhaps some of the club’s supporters will do likewise, given the abrupt, acrimonious nature of his departure to Leicester — but watching them under Rodgers was a joy, particularly given the way that Kieran Tierney, Olivier Ntcham and Moussa Dembele developed under his tutelage.

It is the same story at Leicester. Yes, he has inherited some talented players, but which of Pereira, Chilwell, Ndidi, Tielemans and Maddison was consistently performing to this level under Rodgers’ predecessor Claude Puel? What about Caglar Soyuncu, who looked a little too impetuous on his rare appearances last season but now, aged 22, looks like the perfect replacement for Harry Maguire in central defence?

So often we lament the lack of top-class British coaches, but then, when someone like Rodgers emerges from relative obscurity — starting out as a youth-team coach at Reading after seeing his playing career ended prematurely by injury, travelling far and wide to further his education as a coach, then climbing the management ladder with a skill and a persistence that is rare in an era when time and patience are so scarce, and all the while sticking to football principles that are usually admired — there is a stark reluctance to show him the respect his record merits.

Is it just a classic case of tall poppy syndrome, that all-too-familiar British desperation to cut people down to size? Or are people so accustomed to top-class coaches fitting a certain image — the gruff authoritarian or the ice-cool designer coach from somewhere much warmer than Britain — that someone like Rodgers, an outsider from County Antrim with no playing pedigree to fall back on, is treated as a bluffer?

It is a shame because British football can hardly be said to produce so many high-class coaches that it can afford to look down its nose at Rodgers. In a short space of time, he has transformed the way Leicester play, just as he did at Liverpool — and even at Celtic, where, for all that the numbers and statistics might reflect his impact, the greatest improvement was in their playing style.

So many managers, on moving to the Premier League, find it hard to impose their own style and playing philosophy. Even now, Everton fans might struggle to tell you what Marco Silva’s grand vision is. Likewise Unai Emery at Arsenal or, for all the references to the club’s historic values, Ole Gunnar Solskjaer at Manchester United.

Rodgers took longer to impose his style on Liverpool than anywhere else, but, at Leicester, the uplift has been dramatic.

Some will even argue that he has better players than Emery or Solskjaer. Looking at the evidence of the past six months, you might suggest so. But it is striking how often perceptions of different players, particularly younger ones, have been revised upwards when they are playing under Rodgers. If he can coax such improvement out of Chilwell, Ndidi, Tielemans and Maddison, it is tempting to wonder just what he might have done had he got his hands on some of Arsenal’s or United’s underperformers.

Right now, Leicester are playing with an arrogance. This time last year, under Puel, they were playing with a cautious whisper. Sometimes, teams play in the mould of their manager. Leicester’s fans — like Swansea’s and Celtic’s before them and like Liverpool’s for a good portion of Rodgers’ time at Anfield — will be happy that their team is doing just that.

Thanks. That's the heart of the matter with me. I love watching players and teams improve and Rodgers has given me maximum entertainment wherever he's managed.

Couldn't have picked a better manager to follow. I have a feeling the best is yet to come for him.:)

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Dont like the bad talk about puel, my opinion is he laid the foundations for what we have now and he didnt have much time after we got tielemans in.

 

The state of the team from when puel took over and when he left was clearly an improvement.

 

Of course there is no doubt rodgers has took us up a level. A shrewd appointment.

Edited by Chrysalis
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He is very lucky we plucked him from such a crap league which allows him now to test his tactical knowledge in the best league in the World against some top managers.  Bewick Rovers away or a trip to Anfield to face Liverpool? As Dacia say ‘you do the maths’.  Glad he is here!!  We are lucky:ph34r:

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On 29/09/2019 at 18:25, LinekersLugs said:

This guy is a genius 

 

we are so so lucky to have him 

 

something really special building 

 

very special 

BOOOOOOOOMMMMMM

 

St Brendan 

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I love his positivity and the fact he keeps saying there's room for improvement.

 

He's always talking about the players' education and development and I think he's the perfect manager for this young team.

 

My work is around leadership and coaching in the business world and I'm always interested in what Rogers has to say. He's got a big ego but also a great mix of credibility and approachability and you can see the players really enjoy playing for him.

 

I just hope we can hang on to him as his personal ambitions are probably bigger than LCFC.

 

Just enjoy him while he's here I say.

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I'd have definitely dropped one of Barnes or Perez for Albrighton.

 

Perez in particular was ****ing unreal. Everything he did was spot on. They both were. 

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He's a manager who is annoyed at wayward passes at 7-0 up! The manager we've been crying out for. A demanding man who the players seem to love playing for.

 

So far, he's been brilliant.

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4 minutes ago, Corky said:

He's a manager who is annoyed at wayward passes at 7-0 up! The manager we've been crying out for. A demanding man who the players seem to love playing for.

 

So far, he's been brilliant.

He's to us what Pep is to Manchester City; you can be up by 7 goals, but if the performance isn't maintained and you let your head drop, he'll rail your ass without lube once the match is over.

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On 30/09/2019 at 15:29, murphy said:

He has charisma, much like O'Neill has and I think that goes a long way in terms of motivation and man-management.

 

I think we are a great fit for each other at the moment but if he continues his success he will be off at the first sniff of a top job.

 

United or spuds

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The way he used the word arrogance in his interview last night 

 

like it’s Good to be so confident in your ability that with time arrogance is allowed with success 

 

seriously we are witnessing the rebirth of a managerial colossus , his time hear is likely to be very limited unless the project becomes big enough to meet the needs of his ego , which I love , if we keep him satisfied then he will stay ! 
 

   

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On 29/09/2019 at 20:32, pazzerfox said:

It's not just the manager, the owners are magnificent.  I look at ALL the other clubs and I honestly think we have the best owners in the premier league and beyond.  It's a great time to be a Leicester fan at the moment, we are building something special.  Hold 

We have a great management team from top to bottom, Aiyawatt, Susan Whelan , Rudkin the lot, well managed and solid foundations. Long may it continue.

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On 29/09/2019 at 20:03, StriderHiryu said:

I do rate Lampard actually his team has an actual style to them. But they lost 4-0 to Man U and there’s so much space between their midfield and defensive block that it looks like Moses has parted the seas and led people to freedom through there! That’s why I feel it’s kind of obvious at times he’s still learning the role, though he has a lot of potential.

 

Regarding Pulisic - he’s vastly overrated. His fee was so large because being USA’s best player his commercial value is enormous. That’s not to say he’s bad but he’s probably a player that should be at a Leicester than a Chelsea. His statistics were not that good at Dortmund and once he got injured Sancho came in and never looked back. If you compare the two then Sancho is way, way better. Pulisic could become good but I think it will take him quite a while to get there. I’d rate Hudson-Odoi and Mount as better players already I think. 

 

 

What sort of player is that?

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Some objective analysis from the Fighting Cock 

 

 
JohnnyS
 
Leicester was a one off they said.....
Have to spend big they said....

:walker:
Rodgers is a proper manager. He's proven himself since he's been at Swansea. I'd take him if he's available in the summer. He had his teeth whitened and got involved with a tranny, buy he's still one of the very best coaches in the league as far as I'm concerned.

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