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City of Leicester & Leicestershire - The Good and Historical Stuff

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On 25/08/2020 at 08:51, davieG said:

https://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/news/leicester-news/plan-create-59-student-flats-4451078

 

Plan to create 59 student flats in development in Leicester's Welford Road
The scheme would see some of the current buildings demolished

 

0_Welford-road-frontJPG.jpg

The front of the proposed development for 59 student appartments on Welford Road (Image: Google Maps)

 

 

A planning application has been submitted which could see 59 student "apartments" created in the city centre.

The location for the proposed new development, put forward by Prosol Enterprises LLP, is 100 Welford Road.

The front of the existing property looks out onto Welford Road, with several other buildings facing Regent Road.

If approved, the scheme would see four of the current buildings demolished, with a three-storey, a four-storey and a five-storey building erected in their place.Two of the current buildings would be converted rather than demolished.

 

The application states that the development would create studio apartments primarily for students.

 

Also on site would be a gym, a launderette, a communal area a storage area and two courtyards, the application states.

No on-site parking would be provided.

The site has previously been used as offices, a light engineering premises, a car dealership, a coal merchant's, a builder's and carpenter's workshop, a sawmill and needle manufacturers.

However, it has not been in use since it was a metal fabrication business in 2016.

"The dilapidated cond

ition of the buildings on the site detracts from the character and appearance of the New Walk conservation area," the planning statement adds.

0_Welford-road-buildingJPG.jpg

A visualisation of how the development on Welford Road would look from Regent Road. (Image: Leicester City Council Planning Portal)

The planning statement adds that the materials which would be used used for the new development are red facing brickwork, dark grey cladding panels, timber cladding, light grey powder-coated aluminium window and door units and black metal balustrades.

The target date for a decision on the plan is November 2.

 

The bottom pic is 90% of every new development in Leicester over the past 10 years

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2 hours ago, davieG said:

Image may contain: one or more people, people walking and outdoor

 

The Clock Tower was built in 1868 to control the traffic from 6 streets. It was the first traffic island in the UK.
The building in the centre had to be demolished to make way for it

Dick

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Steve Coogan to star in film about discovery of Richard III under car park
He confirmed his involvement on BBC Radio 2


ByMaia Snow
09:26, 4 SEP 2020

Steve-Coogan.jpg

Coogan has been inspred by the Richard III story

Comedian Steve Coogan has confirmed he is to star in a film about the discovery of the remains of Richard III in a Leicester car park.

He has also written the film, entitled The Lost King, which is about how historian Phillipa Langley was instrumental in finding the last Plantagenet.

The remains of the king were found under a car park in St Martins, in the city centre in 2013, which is now the home of the King Richard III visitor centre.

Following DNA analysis, the remains were confirmed to be Richard's by scientists and archaeologists from the University of Leicester.

Coogan told Zoe Ball on her BBC Radio 2 breakfast show yesterday (September 3) that filming would begin in 2021.


The remains of Richard III were found under a car park in Leicester in 2012 (Image: © University of Leicester)
He said: "Next year we're shooting a film about the woman who found the body of Richard III in a car park in Leicester.

"I play her husband."

Initially on the show, Ball misheard him and thought he was playing Langley herself.

Coogan responded: "20 years ago I would have been playing her. But these days we're not allowed to do that.

"I thought I'll play the man instead."

Rumours about the upcoming film have been circulating since 2017, when Coogan visited the visitor centre in the city along with collaborator Jeff Pope.



At the time, chairman of the centre’s board of trustees Martin Traynor said the pair had not said what the purpose of their visit was at the time but it now appeared clear.

He said: "It looks like they were doing a recce and some research.

"To be honest, Richard’s discovery was such an amazing story someone was eventually going to write a story about it.

"Steve Coogan is a really funny comedian and it will be interesting to see what he does with it.

"It will be fantastic profile for the city and the centre if the film goes ahead.

"I do hope however that they stick as closely as possible to the facts of what happened."

 

https://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/news/local-news/steve-coogan-star-film-discovery-4484036

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  • 2 weeks later...

https://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/news/local-news/ambitious-plan-expand-national-forest-4526095

 

Ambitious plan to expand The National Forest unveiled
Land will be sought where more trees could be planted


ByNick Dawson
04:00, 18 SEP 2020

The National Forest could be branching out southwards into more parts of Leicestershire.

Hinckley and Bosworth Borough Council has resolved to seek Government support for its ambitions to extend the green area, as it works to make the region carbon neutral.

Councillors want to extend the woodland eco-project into areas to the north of Hinckley, down to the A47, to join with Charnwood Forest to the east, as well as west to the A5, to the extent of the borough's borders.

The authority has committed to drawing up plans with the National Forest and Woodland Trust to identify sites.

Officials from the council will also be working to find grants and other funding to buy land and resources for the project, and to cover the costs of planting and the legal framework required.

 

Landowners will also be sought to take part and provide space to plant more trees.

Central Government is already drawing up plans with Defra for subsidies to encourage landowners and farming communities to take part in similar projects.

The borough council declared a climate emergency in July 2019.

Councillor Russ Roberts presented the motion to extend the forest to the council.

He said: “With rapidly rising and increases of traffic and congestion, much tougher and much more ambitious plans will need to be implemented if the borough is to become carbon neutral within the intended time scale.

“Currently the Government has expressed an interest in extending and creating new woodland and forests to help mitigate some of these issues, along with extensive technology and infrastructure changes.


Thorton reservoir, near the south east border of The National Forest.
"25 years ago, large swathes of the Midlands landscape had been left scarred by centuries of coal mining and other heavy industry.

“But a passionate group of people had a vision: a forest.

“The first forest to be created at scale in England for over 1,000 years, it transformed the landscape from black to green. But the story doesn't stop here.

“This is Our National Forest. It belongs to us all.”

The National Forest covers some 200 square miles of the Midlands, including parts of Derbyshire, Leicestershire and Staffordshire.


It covers a large portion of North West Leicestershire, including Ashby, Coalville and Measham, and extends to Bagworth and Thornton reservoir in Hinckley and Bosworth borough and up to Nanpantan in Charnwood district.

Councillor Stuart Bray, leader of the borough council, said: “Whilst I support the sentiments of the motion, I am also keen to see more green corridors created across the area to complement any extension to the forest.

“This could include key opportunity areas in Hinckley along the Battling Brook corridor, Clarendon Park and areas under the control of Severn Trent.

“I have discussed this with my executive lead for planning with a view to exploring further green corridor opportunities in our emerging local plan.”


During the councillors’ discussion of the motion, councillor Bill Crooks said: “I am fully in support of the proposed expansion but we should name the areas proposed i.e. which parishes.

“This would help some parishes, as being in The National Forest and planting up of trees could protect some of their fields from housing development.”

There were previous talks between the borough council and The National Forest Company about identifying further gateways into the forest from the Hinckley area, and how to embed national forest educational programmes into schools.

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https://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/news/leicester-news/buses-stop-running-past-clock-4538293

 

 

Buses to stop running past the Clock Tower from next month - here's why

ByDan MartinPolitics Reporter
04:00, 23 SEP 2020UPDATED07:16, 23 SEP 2020
 

Roads near The Clock Tower will be pedestrianised

The area around Leicester’s historic Clock Tower will become traffic-free next month.

Belgrave Gate, Haymarket and Church Gate are to be closed to all vehicles from Sunday, October 11.

The three roads near the monument are currently heavily used by buses and cabs but the creation of alternative routes for them are now nearing completion and that will mean the area can be pedestrianised.

Businesses in the area are being now contacted this week to tell them about the changes.

 

From Monday, October 12, deliveries to businesses in the area, as well as services such as waste collections, will need to take place between 5am and 11am from Sunday to Friday, and from 5am to 9am on Saturdays – in line with the rest of the city centre pedestrian zone.

Work is currently under way replacing cracked and dislodged paving near the Clock Tower as part of £8.5 million plans to transform the area, which includes the opening of a new link road, called Savoy Street, between Mansfield Street and Belgrave Gate.

New-Clock-Tower-artist-impression-Connec
Artist impression of how the revamp would look
Letters to businesses on Church Gate, between Haymarket and Mansfield Street, Belgrave Gate, between Abbey Street and Haymarket and on Haymarket itself are being delivered this week.

Any businesses with private off-street parking within the extended pedestrian zone will be able to apply for a permit, giving them 24-hour access to the zone.


City mayor Sir Peter Soulsby said: “The new link road will improve bus journey times for passengers, while paving the way for the regeneration of the very heart of the city centre.

“This investment around the Clock Tower will be a boost for local businesses, and work to transform this popular meeting spot with high quality porphyry paving is already well under way, with work on the other streets in the area due to start in the new year.

“Once they’re part of the city centre’s pedestrian zone, businesses in the area will benefit from greater footfall and a much improved street environment.

“The pedestrianisation of the area also means there are opportunities for food outlets on Belgrave Gate and Church Gate to apply for a street cafe licence – which could be a real boost for their business.”


The construction of Savoy Street and the related improvements to Mansfield Street and Sandacre Street are supported by the government’s Local Growth Fund through the Leicester and Leicestershire Enterprise Partnership Limited (LLEP).

 

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Bloody love a story about money being spent on the City Centre and SPS being involved. The comments on Facebook and the Leicester Mercury are HILARIOUS.

 

There are people sitting behind phones and keyboard who are frothing at the mouth, tomato red whenever this topic comes up, and I so enjoy the predictable reaction.

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7 hours ago, davieG said:

https://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/news/leicester-news/buses-stop-running-past-clock-4538293

 

 

Buses to stop running past the Clock Tower from next month - here's why

ByDan MartinPolitics Reporter
04:00, 23 SEP 2020UPDATED07:16, 23 SEP 2020
 

Roads near The Clock Tower will be pedestrianised

The area around Leicester’s historic Clock Tower will become traffic-free next month.

Belgrave Gate, Haymarket and Church Gate are to be closed to all vehicles from Sunday, October 11.

The three roads near the monument are currently heavily used by buses and cabs but the creation of alternative routes for them are now nearing completion and that will mean the area can be pedestrianised.

Businesses in the area are being now contacted this week to tell them about the changes.

 

From Monday, October 12, deliveries to businesses in the area, as well as services such as waste collections, will need to take place between 5am and 11am from Sunday to Friday, and from 5am to 9am on Saturdays – in line with the rest of the city centre pedestrian zone.

Work is currently under way replacing cracked and dislodged paving near the Clock Tower as part of £8.5 million plans to transform the area, which includes the opening of a new link road, called Savoy Street, between Mansfield Street and Belgrave Gate.

New-Clock-Tower-artist-impression-Connec
Artist impression of how the revamp would look
Letters to businesses on Church Gate, between Haymarket and Mansfield Street, Belgrave Gate, between Abbey Street and Haymarket and on Haymarket itself are being delivered this week.

Any businesses with private off-street parking within the extended pedestrian zone will be able to apply for a permit, giving them 24-hour access to the zone.


City mayor Sir Peter Soulsby said: “The new link road will improve bus journey times for passengers, while paving the way for the regeneration of the very heart of the city centre.

“This investment around the Clock Tower will be a boost for local businesses, and work to transform this popular meeting spot with high quality porphyry paving is already well under way, with work on the other streets in the area due to start in the new year.

“Once they’re part of the city centre’s pedestrian zone, businesses in the area will benefit from greater footfall and a much improved street environment.

“The pedestrianisation of the area also means there are opportunities for food outlets on Belgrave Gate and Church Gate to apply for a street cafe licence – which could be a real boost for their business.”


The construction of Savoy Street and the related improvements to Mansfield Street and Sandacre Street are supported by the government’s Local Growth Fund through the Leicester and Leicestershire Enterprise Partnership Limited (LLEP).

 

Looks good and is long overdue.

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  • 4 weeks later...

New road opens in Leicester city centre
By Ruth Gilmore -October 18, 2020

A new road that will improve journey times out of Leicester city centre will open for the first time today (18 October).

The new road – Savoy Street – will link Belgrave Gate with Mansfield Street. It is designed to provide a quick route out of the city centre for buses leaving the Haymarket bus station and form a new, improved route for pedestrians between the city’s two bus stations.

As part of the £4million scheme, which got under way last November, both Mansfield Street and Sandacre Street have been reconstructed and upgraded.

Buses, taxis, pedestrians and cyclists will be able to use the new road from Sunday. The current bus route along Belgrave Gate, Haymarket and Church Gate will close to all vehicles, creating an attractive, safe, traffic-free space around Leicester’s historic Clock Tower.

City Mayor Peter Soulsby said: “This new road will improve bus journey times for passengers, but it also paves the way for the regeneration of a high-profile part of the city centre that clearly needs investment.”

“By re-routing buses onto Savoy Street, we will be able to remove traffic from the Clock Tower area and create a safer – and much more attractive – environment for pedestrians and cyclists.”

“This investment around the Clock Tower will be a boost for local businesses, and work to transform this popular meeting spot with high quality porphyry paving is already well under way, with work on the other streets in the area due to start in the new year.”

“Once they’re part of the city centre’s pedestrian zone, businesses on Haymarket and parts of Belgrave Gate and Church Gate should benefit from greater footfall and a much improved street environment – which could be a real boost for their business.”

The new road takes its name from the art deco cinema that opened on Belgrave Gate in 1937. Later known as the ABC, the Savoy was demolished by its owners in 2007 after lying empty for years.

A giant mural, inspired by the Savoy and two other long-gone venues on Belgrave Gate – the Floral Hall and the Palace Theatre – now provides a fitting backdrop to the new road.

 

0_003MuralAJPG.jpg

 

 

Changes to bus routes as new road through Leicester city centre opens
A cinema used to stand on the site of Savoy Street


ByDan MartinPolitics Reporter
04:00, 17 OCT 2020
NEWS

Giant mural on the site of the old Savoy cinema, Belgrave Gate, Leicester.

A new link road in Leicester is set to open for the first time tomorrow.

The route between Mansfield Street and Belgrave Gate has been completed as part of a £4 million project to improve bus journey times in the city centre.

The new road, called Savoy Street, is intended to provide a quick route for buses leaving the Haymarket bus station, and form part of a new, improved connection for pedestrians between the city’s two bus stations.

Work on the scheme began nearly a year ago, and as part of the development both Mansfield Street and Sandacre Street have been upgraded.

Savoy Street will be open to buses, taxis and cyclists. The current bus route along Belgrave Gate, Haymarket and Church Gate, past Leicester’s historic Clock Tower, will close to all vehicles.

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City Mayor Sir Peter Soulsby said: “This new road will improve bus journey times for passengers, but it also paves the way for the regeneration of a high-profile part of the city centre that clearly needs investment.

“By re-routing buses onto Savoy Street, we will be able to remove traffic from the Clock Tower area and create a safer – and much more attractive – environment for pedestrians and cyclists.

“This investment around the Clock Tower will be a boost for local businesses, and work to transform this popular meeting spot with high quality porphyry [a type of rock] paving is already well under way, with work on the other streets in the area due to start in the new year.

ABC Cinema, Belgrave Gate, Leicester, in the 1960s
The old ABC Cinema, Belgrave Gate, Leicester, in the 1960s. The new road runs through the site.
“Once they’re part of the city centre’s pedestrian zone, businesses on Haymarket and parts of Belgrave Gate and Church Gate should benefit from greater footfall and a much improved street environment – which could be a real boost for their business.”

The Savoy Street scheme is part of the North City Centre Accessibility Improvement Programme, the purpose of which is to upgrade highways, and cycle and pedestrian routes, in various parts of the city.

The whole programme is supported by a £8.96m allocation from the Local Growth Fund, a pot of government funding awarded to the Leicester and Leicestershire Enterprise Partnership Limited (LLEP) for projects that benefit the local area and economy.

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I remember going to the ABC minors as a little kid. Mighty Mouse,Woody Woodpecker, Captain Marvel and some kids film every Saturday morning.

 

IIrc if you bought 3 badges A, B, and C you could have a badge with your name on it. When I went up to ask for my badge the man asked me my name, when I told him he  kept saying "y'what?". I never did get my badge  lol 

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  • 1 month later...
  • 2 weeks later...

https://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/news/leicester-news/gallery/yer-ripe-banana-images-leicester-4765660

 

31 fascinating images from the Leicester Mercury Archive showing the evolution of Leicester Market. It's been on the current site for the past 700 years and has seen some sites and sounds and folk from all walks of life from Kings and Queens to the everyday shopper looking for a bargain.

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21 minutes ago, davieG said:

https://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/news/leicester-news/gallery/yer-ripe-banana-images-leicester-4765660

 

31 fascinating images from the Leicester Mercury Archive showing the evolution of Leicester Market. It's been on the current site for the past 700 years and has seen some sites and sounds and folk from all walks of life from Kings and Queens to the everyday shopper looking for a bargain.

Definitely fascinating. A pity the writer doesn't know the difference between 'sites' and 'sights'.

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On 24/11/2020 at 01:54, davieG said:

127165780_2030705783727679_7073820362294442921_o.jpg?_nc_cat=108&ccb=2&_nc_sid=825194&_nc_eui2=AeGLodF-PwaOehJOU2iRBCBotns1dTiKJYu2ezV1OIoli14xPyjs_nIkHDYSvQSZc1I&_nc_ohc=jX7ZLAWjvBMAX82WpeP&_nc_ht=scontent-lht6-1.xx&oh=027b1e96e6280acddd6434e071048c7e&oe=5FE1253F

You can see the old Wharf Street cricket ground marked on there on the eastern side of the city - site of one of the most famous early cricket matches, the North v the South in 1836. It was the first 'first class' match in Leicester. The South won thanks to the batting of Alfred Mynn and the bowling of William Lillywhite, two of the legendary names of the sport in the 19th century.

 

Cricket was increasingly popular in the northern counties, and in 1836 MCC thought two North-South fixtures would be commercially attractive. The South were determined to win the return match at Leicester in August after the North had won at Lord's in July. Mynn, who had never played in the north before, was one of the main drawcards. And in the intervening period, he was making a name for himself as a batsman after knocking up 92 for MCC against Sussex at Brighton.

 

A big crowd was present by 10 o'clock on the first day, a large proportion of them having walked from Nottingham. Redgate, supported by thousands of local fans, was at his fastest and best, would continually hit Mynn's legs, but it didn't matter. "That was Mr Mynn's day, that was," he would later admit. "It mattered not what length I bowled him - the better I bowled, the harder he hit me away." Mynn went on and on. And so did the bruising on his legs. There was wild enthusiasm when he reached 100, and he was undefeated with 125 when the last wicket fell at 314.

 

Mynn beckoned Lord Beauclerk to him as he staggered into a tent before showing him his leg. Beauclerk, one of the virility cult who were against any leg-guards, was appalled at what he saw. He immediately sent for a stagecoach to take Mynn back to London. But Mynn was so huge, and the leg so inflamed, that he could not get inside, so he lay flat on the roof, where the luggage usually went. The uneven roads of the 1830s would have added considerably to Mynn's discomfort. He began his recovery at the Angel Tavern in St Martin's Lane in London, before moving on to St Bartholomew's Hospital, where eminent surgeons debated whether they could save his leg or not.

 

 

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I like that line about people 'walking from Nottingham to Leicester' to see that cricket match (previous post).  How long would that have taken?  About 10 hours? Weirdly enough, it was exactly 100 years later that the Jarrow Marchers walked the same route. October 1936. It took them 2 days, stopping overnight in Loughborough, but then they had already walked nearly 200 miles. It's another fantastic bit of Leicester history:

 

The marchers were put up at St. Marks’ Church, Belgrave Gate, and The Co-operative Society’s bootmakers worked through the night without pay to repair the marchers’ shoes. 

 

By the way, not as well known as the Jarrow March is the Leicester Unemployment March of June 1905. 497 men walked from Leicester to London. Here's a sample of the response they got. (from The Times): “A walk to London, especially if food and shelter on the way are provided free, will always be attractive to the restless, the shiftless, or the simpletons among the unemployed and unemployable. This form of menace must be resisted. They must be assured their walk proves nothing.”

 

Amos Sheriff was one of the march leaders. In the 1920s he became the first Labour Mayor of Leicester.

 

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On 25/08/2020 at 08:51, davieG said:

https://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/news/leicester-news/plan-create-59-student-flats-4451078

 

Plan to create 59 student flats in development in Leicester's Welford Road
The scheme would see some of the current buildings demolished

 

0_Welford-road-frontJPG.jpg

The front of the proposed development for 59 student appartments on Welford Road (Image: Google Maps)

 

 

A planning application has been submitted which could see 59 student "apartments" created in the city centre.

The location for the proposed new development, put forward by Prosol Enterprises LLP, is 100 Welford Road.

The front of the existing property looks out onto Welford Road, with several other buildings facing Regent Road.

If approved, the scheme would see four of the current buildings demolished, with a three-storey, a four-storey and a five-storey building erected in their place.Two of the current buildings would be converted rather than demolished.

 

The application states that the development would create studio apartments primarily for students.

 

Also on site would be a gym, a launderette, a communal area a storage area and two courtyards, the application states.

No on-site parking would be provided.

The site has previously been used as offices, a light engineering premises, a car dealership, a coal merchant's, a builder's and carpenter's workshop, a sawmill and needle manufacturers.

However, it has not been in use since it was a metal fabrication business in 2016.

"The dilapidated cond

ition of the buildings on the site detracts from the character and appearance of the New Walk conservation area," the planning statement adds.

0_Welford-road-buildingJPG.jpg

A visualisation of how the development on Welford Road would look from Regent Road. (Image: Leicester City Council Planning Portal)

The planning statement adds that the materials which would be used used for the new development are red facing brickwork, dark grey cladding panels, timber cladding, light grey powder-coated aluminium window and door units and black metal balustrades.

The target date for a decision on the plan is November 2.

They are some lovely old buildings, being run down by housing a bunch of drunks whenever I go past. Sickening we are still bulldozing these buildings for crappy flats. 

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