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davieG

What do/did you want to do when you start(ed) work....

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Graduated from uni in Civil Engineering, worked as a site engineer for numerous firms, now find myself as a project engineer for a local authority. Has its perks and don't hate it.

 

Life is just one big adventure and have to take the opportunities when they present themselves.

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3 minutes ago, Ollie93 said:

Graduated from uni in Civil Engineering, worked as a site engineer for numerous firms, now find myself as a project engineer for a local authority. Has its perks and don't hate it.

 

Life is just one big adventure and have to take the opportunities when they present themselves.

My old man is now long retired but he was a Civil Engineer (a chief estimator by the end).
 

Apparently when I was about 6, the teacher went round the class and asked us all what our parents did for work. I said my Dad is a ‘silly engineer’ according to my mum :D

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4 minutes ago, Izzy said:

My old man is now long retired but he was a Civil Engineer (a chief estimator by the end).
 

Apparently when I was about 6, the teacher went round the class and asked us all what our parents did for work. I said my Dad is a ‘silly engineer’ according to my mum :D

I see you started the comedy at a young age lol

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6 minutes ago, Izzy said:

My old man is now long retired but he was a Civil Engineer (a chief estimator by the end).
 

Apparently when I was about 6, the teacher went round the class and asked us all what our parents did for work. I said my Dad is a ‘silly engineer’ according to my mum :D

 

At the same age, our class was asked to paint a picture of what our Mum or Dad did usually.

 

My Dad worked night shifts once or twice a week......so I painted a picture of him lying in bed with bristles all over his chin.

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Really interesting to read all the different ambitions and hopes from everybody's younger days.

 

I don't think I've ever really had a clear idea of what I wanted to do for a living. I think it was always anxiety and perceived expectations getting in the way of me listening to my heart, so to speak.

 

I've been doing marketing for the last few years, but my heart just isn't in it and a difficult boss hasn't helped. However it's mostly an easy life where I'm just left to get on with things, so I do the bare minimum, head home, and try to enjoy my life outside work best I can. 

 

Now at 32, I've realised I want to take more from life than that, so am trying to make adjustments. I still find it difficult to tune into my own wants, needs, and desires, but I'm slowly getting a bit better at it with a lot of work.

 

I start a foundation course in counselling and psychotherapy next month. If I like it and pursue it further, it's a long 4 year road to becoming qualified and i'll have to find something else in the meantime. I still don't know if it's truly the path for me, but I do know that in 4 years time if I'd not have taken a risk, I'd regret the inaction even more.

 

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4 minutes ago, egg_fried_rice said:

Really interesting to read all the different ambitions and hopes from everybody's younger days.

 

I don't think I've ever really had a clear idea of what I wanted to do for a living. I think it was always anxiety and perceived expectations getting in the way of me listening to my heart, so to speak.

 

I've been doing marketing for the last few years, but my heart just isn't in it and a difficult boss hasn't helped. However it's mostly an easy life where I'm just left to get on with things, so I do the bare minimum, head home, and try to enjoy my life outside work best I can. 

 

Now at 32, I've realised I want to take more from life than that, so am trying to make adjustments. I still find it difficult to tune into my own wants, needs, and desires, but I'm slowly getting a bit better at it with a lot of work.

 

I start a foundation course in counselling and psychotherapy next month. If I like it and pursue it further, it's a long 4 year road to becoming qualified and i'll have to find something else in the meantime. I still don't know if it's truly the path for me, but I do know that in 4 years time if I'd not have taken a risk, I'd regret the inaction even more.

 

So true. Glad you're looking to change direction, after all, we only regret the things we don't do.

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I wanted to be a camera man for sky sports originally. Then when I was almost thrown straight in to choosing something for uni I went for property development which covered valuation, law, economics etc. I thought I would go in to residential valuation and worked in an estate agents after uni. 
 

However I didn’t really like it and didn't enjoy working all week and then Saturday so I left. Tried a few different things but then ended up as a trainee estimator for a company within the construction industry. We sell to the major and regional house builders. I have now been there 5 years and I am in charge of sales. Enjoy it as there is so much going on and each day is different. Also like travelling all over but that has reduced due to Covid.

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Wanted to be a pilot but I'm scared of flying. 

So I wanted to be an Air Traffic Controller but I didn't make it past the final round of the process first time I did it and then I was in the process at the start of the pandemic but now with the sinking of air travel they're not recruiting. 

Would be great to be a comedian. I did an open spot once and had Michael Legge come up to mesaying I should give it go more but I don't think I could handle it

 

Was doing economic and data consulting work between September and Feb. Left cos I couldn't stand the middle layer of people at the place and wasnt overly interested in the work. Had my new job offer withdrawn cos of the pandemic so now sat on my backside going nowhere, Wanna work in startups but job market is tough, been doing pro bono work over pandemic for a few though. 

 

Came in for a bit of inheritance so am working with a friend to found something ourselves, we'll see what happens there, maybe the next unicorn lol. 

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Graduated uni last year with a Masters in Biomed, mixture of missing out and being unsure if I wanted a PhD has meant I've become a technician in the undergrad labs of another uni. Isn't a bad job by any means, the organisation and management make life a lot more difficult than it should be. Hoping to move into a more meaningful area of science such as active research/a pharma company or at least to stay within science.

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30 minutes ago, Kopfkino said:

 

I can't believe how naive I used to be to this. The hubrism that comes with a private education is something else. When I turned up at uni I remember having heavy imposter syndrome cos of the backgrounds and lives of loads of the people I met there. They seemed so sure of themselves, spraying around words and knowledge that seemed far beyond me. But I soon realised it was all just inane bullshit and many of them weren't particularly intelligent, they just said mildly abstract things confidently enough. Lo and behold, they're also the ones that go on to the supposed elite careers despite there being absolutely no substance there. They just knew how to talk confidently, navigate processes, and game exams. 

 

Its a weird one for me cos inside I actually have huge self-belief and self-confidence but it doesn't transfer to the outside. I downplay and undersell so much, so on the inside I am thinking I am the greatest thing ever to grace the planet but on the outside everything I've ever done is crap compared to everyone else. 

 

 

I’ve learnt over the years that life is all one big game mate.

 

We’ve all got a choice to either sit in the stands and watch everyone else play, or put on our boots, get on the pitch and show our talents.


Btw, my old man in the cleverest fella I know but spent his life sat in the stands moaning about others playing the game and getting the rewards.

 

He still regrets it 10 years into retirement and he never reached his potential. Bit sad really..

 

As Alf said, you’ve gotta back yourself and fvck what others think or say about you.

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What an interesting thread. 

 

I wanted to be a journalist. My parents, bless them, would've loved me to be an office clerk and do as I was told for 30 years. 

 

Instead, I've spent nearly 30 years trying to avoid work. Almost always sales jobs, which are fairly well suited to the lazy. You can drill it in sales for bursts and then coast for long periods. Almost always fall out with employer though. 16 jobs in 30 years FFS. 

 

 

 

 

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37 minutes ago, Izzy said:

I’ve learnt over the years that life is all one big game mate.

 

We’ve all got a choice to either sit in the stands and watch everyone else play, or put on our boots, get on the pitch and show our talents.


Btw, my old man in the cleverest fella I know but spent his life sat in the stands moaning about others playing the game and getting the rewards.

 

He still regrets it 10 years into retirement and he never reached his potential. Bit sad really..

 

As Alf said, you’ve gotta back yourself and fvck what others think or say about you and even then it might not work out, in fact it's above odds that it won't, but it's the best and probably only chance you have.

Sorry to temper that one with a bit of pragmatic realism Izzy, but IMO that's the truth of the matter.

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7 minutes ago, leicsmac said:

Sorry to temper that one with a bit of pragmatic realism Izzy, but IMO that's the truth of the matter.

Yes, however if you don't try you'll never know.

 

I honestly believe, within reason, anyone can achieve anything they want, should they want it badly enough.

 

I'm on about the people that almost obsessively persue things, it's amazing what you can achieve when you look back. Fcuk other peoples opinions and just go for it.

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26 minutes ago, Paninistickers said:

Instead, I've spent nearly 30 years trying to avoid work. Almost always sales jobs, which are fairly well suited to the lazy. You can drill it in sales for bursts and then coast for long periods. Almost always fall out with employer though. 16 jobs in 30 years FFS.

16 jobs in 30 years?! That's some going!

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22 minutes ago, leicsmac said:

Sorry to temper that one with a bit of pragmatic realism Izzy, but IMO that's the truth of the matter.

 

14 minutes ago, Ollie93 said:

Yes, however if you don't try you'll never know.

 

I honestly believe, within reason, anyone can achieve anything they want, should they want it badly enough.

 

I'm on about the people that almost obsessively persue things, it's amazing what you can achieve when you look back. Fcuk other peoples opinions and just go for it.

The man who thinks he can and the man who thinks he can’t are probably both right…. I think I saw it on one of this crappy inspirational posters you see on office walls, but, it’s a truism!

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14 minutes ago, Ollie93 said:

Yes, however if you don't try you'll never know.

 

I honestly believe, within reason, anyone can achieve anything they want, should they want it badly enough.

 

I'm on about the people that almost obsessively persue things, it's amazing what you can achieve when you look back. Fcuk other peoples opinions and just go for it.

First sentence is absolutely true and you trying is the only way that you'll succeed, so people have to - sitting on the sidelines, as Izzy said, does nothing.

 

The second sentence, however...nah. There's a billion stories of people who gave it all they had, couldn't do any more, and it didn't end up working out for them because of the direct or indirect actions of people better placed in life than them or simple shite luck. That's a pretty big "within reason" for me tbh, and I'm not going to turn around and say it's their responsibility that they didn't make it, because it ain't and IMO it's a bit cruel to infer so.

 

It's like a poker game - through skill and effort you can parley the situation into one where the odds are in your favour to do well...but after that and when all the money is in the pot with cards still to come, it's no longer in your hands.

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2 minutes ago, leicsmac said:

First sentence is absolutely true and you trying is the only way that you'll succeed, so people have to - sitting on the sidelines, as Izzy said, does nothing.

 

The second sentence, however...nah. There's a billion stories of people who gave it all they had, couldn't do any more, and it didn't end up working out for them because of the direct or indirect actions of people better placed in life than them or simple shite luck. That's a pretty big "within reason" for me tbh, and I'm not going to turn around and say it's their responsibility that they didn't make it, because it ain't and IMO it's a bit cruel to infer so.

 

It's like a poker game - through skill and effort you can parley the situation into one where the odds are in your favour to do well...but after that and when all the money is in the pot with cards still to come, it's no longer in your hands.

Yes, but using your analogy, the more poker games you play, the higher the odds of you winning. 

 

I think what I was trying to say is a lot of people say they want something, very few actually go out and try and get it.

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26 minutes ago, Ollie93 said:

Yes, but using your analogy, the more poker games you play, the higher the odds of you winning. 

 

I think what I was trying to say is a lot of people say they want something, very few actually go out and try and get it.

Oh yeah, no disagreement there.

 

There's not as many people as one might think that really show the will needed, but at the same time, doing so is no guarantor of success.

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35 minutes ago, Ollie93 said:

Yes, but using your analogy, the more poker games you play, the higher the odds of you winning. 

 

I think what I was trying to say is a lot of people say they want something, very few actually go out and try and get it.

I agree. I think it's almost certain that cast iron willpower, will actually get you there. It's just degrees.of success that's questionable. 

 

If someone really really wanted to make it in, say, the music business....at worst they'll have played gigs to a crowd, had a demo played on the radio and have a miniscule YouTube / podcast following. At worst. Still better than 99.9% of people will ever do.

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