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Stivo

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About Stivo

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  1. It seems to grow during the week, perhaps the centres cannot book until they receive a batch early in the week?
  2. I think that in retrospect the introduction of the 28 day figure for the dashboard reporting was a mistake as it has enabled some of this nonsense to exist. People react to/focus on a story on social media about a friend of a friend who died in a car crash after testing positive, and don’t bother to read or understand detailed posts from people like @Kopfkino who have demonstrated how tiny as a percentage any such cases will ever be.
  3. Can I just say thanks for posting this. The article is fascinating.
  4. Did you get given a leaflet on side effects? If you feel that they are severe then there should be a way to report them.
  5. To add to the posts above. we remain on track to vaccinate everyone in the priority groups by mid feb. we vaccinated almost 1/2 million people last Saturday. Most people offered the jab are turning up to get it. hopefully in a couple of weeks the data will show a drop in hospitalisations in the elderly ( that’s future good news to look out for) the German report that the vaccine doesn’t work seems to have been a mistake
  6. The U.K. approval is here https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/regulatory-approval-of-covid-19-vaccine-astrazeneca/information-for-healthcare-professionals-on-covid-19-vaccine-astrazeneca as mentioned above the number of participants over 65 was low (660) and at the end of December only 2 of them had caught covid which wasn’t sufficient to conclude anything about the effectiveness in that population. However testing for antibodies showed that those elderly participants had successfully developed antibodies which is a strong positive sign. Unless a lot
  7. That’s it though, it doesn’t mutate to survive, it has no concept of surviving, and mutations are just accidents. Mistakes in copying arise, and if they are better fitted to surviving then they become more prevalent. Each individual flu virus doesn’t know that we are behaving differently this year and it cannot devise a purposeful plan to adapt. By socially distancing we are applying a selective pressure. If a mutation or more likely a set of mutations accidentally arose that made flu more transmissible in a socially distanced world then yes it would have an advant
  8. I wouldn’t worry too much, a virus has no concept of the big picture. If a virus is prevalent in the population and (because there is a lot of copying going on) a mistake arises that spreads better then that more successfully variant will spread faster. With flu there is currently much less of it about, less copying and so less chance of a new strain arising,
  9. Last week the figures dropped for 3 days from this point, so we shouldn’t be too worried if there is a drop tomorrow.
  10. No, but hopefully most people can understand that a minority within the (small) orthodox community is not representative of the wider Jewish community. Israel has its own problems with some Orthodox Jews not following their lockdown.
  11. It’s 10% of adult population, Boris stated it at one point. ( about 15M are under 18).
  12. Boris seemed to suggest that the mid feb target was still doable.
  13. In less good news it has been suggested today that the new U.K. variant might have a 30% higher IFR so moving from 0.7% up towards 1%, but this isn’t certain yet.
  14. I think this is a good point. Looking at the dashboard we have 1.3M people who received their first dose by 3rd Jan, so almost all of these are now more than 3 weeks since the first jab. Hopefully we are starting to see a reduction in cases and hospitalisations in this cohort.
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