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what?

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what? last won the day on 12 August 2016

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  1. Yeah we're shit but I recken we might be good for at least another. Maybe it's the rain but it feels like De Gea has an error in him tonight
  2. I would settle for no punishment, as long as there's a government review that ends with a 50+1 rule being imposed to stop them just trying again in a few years. I realise that's pie in the sky though. I'm sure now this has crumbled the Tories' will to actually do anything will evaporate too
  3. This is fascinating to watch and obviously it's brilliant that it's crumbling but you just know they're going to sweep this under the rug in terms of punishment. There'll be a small face-saving fines, maybe a transfer ban, nothing that really makes any lasting difference.
  4. Interesting to hear Marcus Bean on football weekly predicting that the players won't care about being banned from international competition
  5. anyone else getting zero work done today?
  6. Actually kinda hilarious to think how instantly the balance of power in international football would be completely different. I wonder who the biggest winners and losers would be
  7. The problem if the 6 do go would obviously be the financial and talent knock on drains to the rest of the clubs. But assuming all that could be mitigated (highly questionable I know) how great would a league that was so much more of an equal competition be?! Maybe with some new regulations to actually discourage new super clubs from forming, wage and transfer caps etc. That league would be infinitely more enjoyable and exciting, even if the technical standard of the football on display took a bit of a hit.
  8. The only thing that stops this is a strike, players and club workers. Paralyse the clubs ability to compete and their value vanishes. ****, Man United are listed on the NYSE, watch their value implode. Unfortunately I can't see there being the political will in the PFA to make it happen. 30 years of anti-union and anti-strike legislation have seen to that.
  9. It's even more ridiculous when you consider the very real possibility of an independent Scotland some time within the next decade
  10. "The bourgeoisie cannot exist without constantly revolutionising the instruments of production, and thereby the relations of production, and with them the whole relations of society. Conservation of the old modes of production in unaltered form, was, on the contrary, the first condition of existence for all earlier industrial classes. Constant revolutionising of production, uninterrupted disturbance of all social conditions, everlasting uncertainty and agitation distinguish the bourgeois epoch from all earlier ones. All fixed, fast-frozen relations, with their train of ancient and venerable pr
  11. I'd switch my my closest local team, Union Berlin. It's only my childhood in Leicestershire (and my less than excellent German skills) that has kept me supporting English football from a far.
  12. Surely Mourinho's sacking must be connected to this. He's always seen himself as separate from the ruling clique of football. Would love to see him come out all guns blazing against this
  13. I don't know much about the PFA, how political they are. I assume not very. A shame as they could stop this in a second with a strike. Imagine the beautiful scenes of players and fans joining a picket and blocking entry to the grounds. All that value that the money men are trying to protect evaporates pretty quick once the players decide they're not going to cooperate. I know they're absurdly wealthy but they are still waged workers when you get down to brass tacks.
  14. That's one way to be rewarded yes. Just like if you're a starting a mobile phone company you'll try to be technologically innovative and create something that is better than the competition. But it's also the hardest and least secure way to succeed. When you're big enough and rich enough you no longer have an economic imperative to succeed that way because you can just use your wealth and power to rig the game to your benefit. That's why 30 years of neoliberalism have left us not with a dynamic marketplace of small companies jostling for position by creating out of need but rather giant monopo
  15. I think there are a few important points to highlight here. First that once you allow a sport to be run as a business under capitalist conditions, a key contradiction inevitably arises between sporting competition and economic competition. There's no reform or adjustment to the system that resolves that contradiction, privileging profit is baked into the system as the central tenet. You see it in whatever field of life capitalism extends itself to. Healthcare, housing, education. It doesn't matter how important or morally just the original purpose is, once capitalism gets it, it's secondary to
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