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Finnaldo

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Finnaldo last won the day on 22 August 2015

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About Finnaldo

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    Elvis Hammond in disguise
  • Birthday 20/02/1997

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    The dark reaches of Leicestershire
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    1997

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  1. Its true that perhaps certain failures of a manifesto had led to downfall of multiple governments. My frustration is more to do with how Brexit is ultimately perceived as something bigger and more irreversible than it is. If certain Leave supporters are pissed off that Brexit is cancelled, that’s understandable, but I don’t agree with the idea it’s a flagrant move against democracy. Yeah, it’s true we probably wouldn’t agree with whose been the most opportunistic. At least, whose done the most damage, but it’s not necessarily important at this point. I’m glad you agree with my second point though. Any change of governance is ultimately a new mandate and, even if Brexit hasn’t been pushed through by then, there’s no point making out it’s fulfilment is an important democratic necessity.
  2. This is an interesting point actually. Of course that's fully true in our Parliamentary, but government after government how many manifesto promises are made and not followed up on? It's rarely declared an outrage or an affront to democracy, and other than the Lib Dems losing student vote after their tuition promise failing, I can't think how often it's ever considered a grave misdemeanor to simply not follow through on manifesto promises. Ultimately, the Brexit referendum is a bygone relic from two governments ago which has been absolutely slaughtered and the process has demoralised and polarised British society. If a Corbyn government was to be voted in tomorrow, immediately have a referendum for an aggressive nationalisation campaign that passed 52-48 and became a three year slog of legal battles and protest, only for a Lib Dem/Tory government to get in and cancel it straight up, would it be an affront to a democracy? Would we all suggest that the new government should follow up and force through nationisation, even if it was to wreck the economy, and then just sort it out after? It seems, simply as there was an ***ADVISORY*** referendum that its now some do or die task and encompasses democracy as a whole. What separates this from any other manifesto promise that's too big or too ambitious or simply never followed through on before a new government inevitably forgets or scraps it? It's ultimately led to the Conservative Party of 2010, that was resurgent and popular generally, to a Party that's deselected elected MPs for simply going against the party on one vote (which the current government was infamous for as backbenchers), with a pantomime Victorian baddie as Leader of the House and a Prime Minister that embarrassed himself at every public opportunity and only defence was being labelled a 'harmless buffoon' before being elected by the party. Brexit, however people look at it, is a policy. It's not a manifestation of democratic ideals, it's not some bastion of the common people vs the elite, it's just been framed this way, as a larger than life event, by opportunists on both sides (although, in my opinion on one side moreso than the other) who can use it as a platform for power or as a vehicle to make their investors a hell of a lot of money.
  3. This may have been true years ago, but we live in a time where the President of the US went in a sulk and cancelled a State visit because Denmark refused to consider selling Greenland, yet he'll likely be odds on favourite in the next Presidential Election. Cummings is the head advisor admitted, no, bragged about using psyops tactics on social media in the referendum. I honestly don't care if you want to Leave or Remain because I've lost hope in the process but to argue that Boris, who was largely portrayed as a buffoon and 'lovable moron' by even The Sun and Daily Mail a decade ago, isn't an extremely awful reflection on both the Conservative Party and Britain as a whole as Prime Minister, then I have a bridge to sell you. He must be one of the first politicians to run a campaign by totally removing himself from the public eye The reason he backtracked on his initial declaration to then back a General Election is because he can run it not on himself as Prime Minister but on the back of anger of the whole totally fvcked process and target it at the 'undesirable' ( see: not loyal to his very narrow definition of a Conservative MP) elements of Parliament. Both he & Cummings realise a campaign ran as Boris Johnson rather than Hard Brexit would be a disaster which is why he's so keen on getting through. Cummings is a divisive little cretin and I hope once this is all done whatever the outcome people come to understand the damage he's done to this country. He's damaged and polarised British society more than the likes of shitheads like Anjem Chouhary could ever dream of.
  4. Vering off-topic but this is very true. There’s plenty of here who obviously have a naturally negative opinion on Nottingham but it’s for mutual benefit we should work to boost the cultural and historical aspects of the East Midlands. Between Leicester, Nottingham & Lincoln (guess we have to include Derby as well) there’s plenty of tourism and nice city spots that could be exploited and between them much more stunning countryside as well as the foot of the Peak District. Its in our own interest we work with other mid-sized cities to ensure the likes of Birmingham and Leeds don’t use us the same way London has essentially used the South East and South Midlands.
  5. We'll likely always disagree on this, I think a one-on-one referendum has to be the ultimate outcome, but I respect your thinking and it does make sense.
  6. See this is where there's a deadlock over how referendum's ran! I agree with Strokes that it should be tiered (single transferable vote arguably gives a 2 to 1 advantage to Brexit), but I feel it's better the final choice is Remain vs Leave having known for certain if it will be Deal or No Deal, it gives people a genuine idea of what Leave is.
  7. Would be interesting how it would be executed. Would either have to nail it down as a No Deal vs Remain referendum, or come to terms with a deal and have that compete with no deal, and then have the prevailing Leave option compete against Remain. I can't see a second referendum before a GE at this rate though.
  8. The one thing the entire Brexit saga has been good for in my eyes has been the massive failures in our political system. It's taken up to now for people to understand roughly how Parliament operates and with the daily mishaps and battles it's drawn a lot pf eyes to Parliament and as they say, sunlight is the best disinfectant. Of course there's likely still an apathetic majority, but regardless of what happens I'm hoping there's enough non-partisan anger to steer a proper reform of our democracy.
  9. Absolutely nothing could or will ever top MattP and Hitler. I think there was a whole thread dedicated to it, poor bugger took it well bless him
  10. Shitting it a bit because whilst it's a fixture early in the season against a team we'd usually expect a loss against, it feels like there's something else riding on it. Really hoping we play them off the park and win, but it's rarely that easy in teh Prem, especially at Old Trafford. If we can turn up and they're still in a twist, hopefully a good 2-1 or 3-1 win.
  11. This topic could probably use something a bit more lighthearted:
  12. It didn't go ahead but they were proposed at the top of football clubs. Franchising is a creeping influence in English football, it's inevitable.
  13. Certainly better than many but I'm not a fan of the abstract block shape. That's personal taste though.
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