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davieG

Technology, Science and the Environment.

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6 hours ago, davieG said:

Of course and I'm one of them being in lockdown/housebound for over a year but I do it in the knowledge that I'm off the road. So I was just pointing out that it's not a simple equation for example when I have my food shopping delivered, for which I'm most grateful that's two journeys saved and delivered by someone who is also supplying someone else nearby as I can see that when I book my delivery.

 

6 hours ago, Free Falling Foxes said:

If there is an overall net reduction in car travel/use due directly, even indirectly, because of home delivery then great, However I strongly suspect that isn't the case. Hence my original point about the effect on the environment.

 

To me, it would seem ordering whatever from where ever and having it delivered in hours or even a few days in the case of overseas, is unsustainable in an environmental view.

 

It is shipping - as in cargo on ships - that takes up the vast majority of emissions when it comes to delivering products.

 

Perhaps, as science and tech advances, we will find a solution to that whereby things that are needed are produced from scratch and on demand locally, reducing the length of the delivery chain.

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16 hours ago, leicsmac said:

 

It is shipping - as in cargo on ships - that takes up the vast majority of emissions when it comes to delivering products.

 

Perhaps, as science and tech advances, we will find a solution to that whereby things that are needed are produced from scratch and on demand locally, reducing the length of the delivery chain.

I would think that air freight also significantly adds to emissions too, wouldn't it?

I have also read that over half of the transport related carbon emissions come from cars and other light vehicles. (EPA website)

Edited by Free Falling Foxes
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6 hours ago, Free Falling Foxes said:

I would think that air freight also significantly adds to emissions too, wouldn't it?

I have also read that over half of the transport related carbon emissions come from cars and other light vehicles. (EPA website)

https://ourworldindata.org/co2-emissions-from-transport

 

This website seems to back your claims, too. :thumbup:

 

Seems that shipping is how the majority of stuff gets around, but not how the variety of emissions are produced, then. Looking at this it's reasonably clear that it is individual transport (and to a lesser extent road freight) that needs to change the most.

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https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-56427280

 

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-56431346

 

....anyone else seeing the reasonably large logical dissonance in these two stories?

 

Wanting to double science funding...and then batting for a government that then chops collaborative science funding off at the knees - both viewed through the lens of Covid.

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6 hours ago, leicsmac said:

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-56427280

 

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-56431346

 

....anyone else seeing the reasonably large logical dissonance in these two stories?

 

Wanting to double science funding...and then batting for a government that then chops collaborative science funding off at the knees - both viewed through the lens of Covid.

I guess any episode of Yes Minister would explain how this sort of thing happens?

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23 minutes ago, leicsmac said:

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-56442020

 

Good stuff! Another check on the road back to the Moon.

Although I knew that the SLS will rely upon the tried and tested reliability of the RS25 (in addition to the solids) I didn't appreciate that the test was using refurbished engines from the shuttle programme. 

 

One can only marvel over the mighty Rocketdyne F1s that powered the first stage of the Saturn V but were initially conceived in the late 1950s. 

Edited by Line-X
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4 minutes ago, Line-X said:

Although I knew that the SLS will rely upon the tried and tested reliability of the RS25 (in addition to the solids) I didn't appreciate that the test was using refurbished engines from the shuttle programme. 

 

One can only marvel over the mighty Rocketdyne F1s that powered the first stage of the Saturn V but were initially conceived in the late 1950s. 

You would think they would have new engines for this new program, yeah. I guess they feel using the old ones is a combination of reliance and cost effectiveness.

 

Still, exciting times!

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13 hours ago, The Syrup said:

NASA have confirmed we're safe from a once-feared asteroid, Apophis, for 'at least 100 years'.

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-56547727

 

 

To be honest, I'm interested in how we might be able to alter its path to collide with us sooner.

 

Speaking of pessimistic predictions, this makes fun reading:

 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2021/mar/28/shanna-swan-fertility-reproduction-count-down

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40 minutes ago, Bellend Sebastian said:

To be honest, I'm interested in how we might be able to alter its path to collide with us sooner.

 

Speaking of pessimistic predictions, this makes fun reading:

 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2021/mar/28/shanna-swan-fertility-reproduction-count-down

Putting a lander on the side of it and letting Isaac Newton do the rest of the work would be enough, given enough time.

 

As for the latter point here, I'm actually not as worried about this as some of my buddies in the scientific community are - it strikes me as a problem with a few different solutions that wouldn't be too difficult to be implemented.

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1 hour ago, leicsmac said:

https://www.bbc.com/news/56643677

 

The Standard Model has always had flaws. Perhaps this is one step towards patching them.

At last, an explanation of why Muons wobble around so much! In fact, experiments carried out by Brookhaven National Laboratory in 2006 involving the Muons found that they exhibited behaviour as a result of physics beyond the Standard Model, implying that some unknown fifth force might be causing it.   

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