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Costock_Fox

Yorkshire Three Peaks

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Thinking about doing the above, Has anyone on here done it? If so any tips/advice would be welcome.

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Just now, Sharpe's Fox said:

three-peaks-4-3-280-2450917_478x359.jpg

 

The lads

Yeah il just call Nigel and ask him.

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20 minutes ago, Costock_Fox said:

Thinking about doing the above, Has anyone on here done it? If so any tips/advice would be welcome.

 

Yeah I did it as part of the training for the National three peaks. Mentally I found the Yorkshire three peaks tougher as it is a long old slog of a walk - particularly in between two of the peaks where it felt never ending. On the national three peaks it's up and down and then back onto your transport for a sit down and break, with the Yorkshire one, that luxury of being taken to the base of the next climb is gone.

 

If you're going to do it then make sure you are with a group of people who you can happily just chat to for hours on end because the actual walk itself wasn't that difficult - it was just mind numbing!! Our group of 6 people doing it was down to 3 by half way and one of those was the guide who was a dot in the distance for a good chunk of it!

 

Oh and there's a place just by the viaduct which is great to meet up with someone if you are with someone who is driving - meant we didn't have to carry too much and could change soggy clothes at that point. There was also a random tea / coffee van which was a god send as it was bloody freezing when we did it.

 

Must admit that my feet were ruined by the end of it but that was more down to it being the first "big" walk of our training. Good walking boots and socks are essential I would say - and make sure you have a couple of spare dry pairs of socks too - nothing worse than soggy socks when you're walking!

 

 

 

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4 minutes ago, syston_fox said:

 

Yeah I did it as part of the training for the National three peaks. Mentally I found the Yorkshire three peaks tougher as it is a long old slog of a walk - particularly in between two of the peaks where it felt never ending. On the national three peaks it's up and down and then back onto your transport for a sit down and break, with the Yorkshire one, that luxury of being taken to the base of the next climb is gone.

 

If you're going to do it then make sure you are with a group of people who you can happily just chat to for hours on end because the actual walk itself wasn't that difficult - it was just mind numbing!! Our group of 6 people doing it was down to 3 by half way and one of those was the guide who was a dot in the distance for a good chunk of it!

 

Oh and there's a place just by the viaduct which is great to meet up with someone if you are with someone who is driving - meant we didn't have to carry too much and could change soggy clothes at that point. There was also a random tea / coffee van which was a god send as it was bloody freezing when we did it.

 

Must admit that my feet were ruined by the end of it but that was more down to it being the first "big" walk of our training. Good walking boots and socks are essential I would say - and make sure you have a couple of spare dry pairs of socks too - nothing worse than soggy socks when you're walking!

 

 

 

Perfect. Yep I am trying to get a group together so it will be people I get on with pretty well.

 

I got a bit confused when I googled 3 peaks and saw the national one. That looks great but the driving in between looks a pain in the arse but Snowdon will be on the list at some point.

 

Yeah I would make sure I don't get wet feet at any point, **** that lol. Do you recon you need a guide?

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I've done it, and like any physical challenge it was daunting but in some ways a lot easier on the day than it might have been because there were loads of other folk doing it and you get carried away by the occasion to an extent.

 

As far as preparation is concerned, it may seem blindingly obvious but train by walking up hills.  Unless you're INCREDIBLY unfit, walking on the flat isn't that much of an effort (according to my heart rate monitor anyway), so save time by just walking up any hills you can find (Edale's a good base for this if you're in the Midlands) rather than focussing on getting miles under your belt, as it were 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Costock_Fox said:

Perfect. Yep I am trying to get a group together so it will be people I get on with pretty well.

 

I got a bit confused when I googled 3 peaks and saw the national one. That looks great but the driving in between looks a pain in the arse but Snowdon will be on the list at some point.

 

Yeah I would make sure I don't get wet feet at any point, **** that lol. Do you recon you need a guide?

I say guide but he was just the organisers husband and he had done the walk before rather than anything official lol

 

You should try the National one if you enjoy this but you would need a mate who would do the driving for you rather to give you a chance to rest a bit. The idea is to do it in 24 hours but in reality that's so tough as relying on clear roads to some degree. Ours was part of a work organised event and we did it on a coach so no chance of 24 hours as the coach couldn't even get to the bottom of Scarfell!

 

Snowdon is a good one for training on as it's not difficult at all and pretty quick going up and down. I think we started climbing that at about 4am when we did it so was pretty cool being on it and watching the sun come up

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1 hour ago, syston_fox said:

I say guide but he was just the organisers husband and he had done the walk before rather than anything official lol

 

You should try the National one if you enjoy this but you would need a mate who would do the driving for you rather to give you a chance to rest a bit. The idea is to do it in 24 hours but in reality that's so tough as relying on clear roads to some degree. Ours was part of a work organised event and we did it on a coach so no chance of 24 hours as the coach couldn't even get to the bottom of Scarfell!

 

Snowdon is a good one for training on as it's not difficult at all and pretty quick going up and down. I think we started climbing that at about 4am when we did it so was pretty cool being on it and watching the sun come up

Yeah I realised it would be a push for time doing all three of them in 24 hours but would be cool to do.

 

I actually started looking at doing Kilimanjaro but thought not to get too far ahead of myself and see how this goes. 

 

I've been speaking to a friend who did three peaks last year and he said a road was flooded so turned into a river crossing which he fell in within 20 minutes of starting lol.

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1 hour ago, Bellend Sebastian said:

I've done it, and like any physical challenge it was daunting but in some ways a lot easier on the day than it might have been because there were loads of other folk doing it and you get carried away by the occasion to an extent.

 

As far as preparation is concerned, it may seem blindingly obvious but train by walking up hills.  Unless you're INCREDIBLY unfit, walking on the flat isn't that much of an effort (according to my heart rate monitor anyway), so save time by just walking up any hills you can find (Edale's a good base for this if you're in the Midlands) rather than focussing on getting miles under your belt, as it were 

 

 

Cheers.

 

At the gym I go mental on a powermill stepper machine so training by walking up hills shouldn't be necessary as I think I am pretty physically fit.

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I live about 25 miles from Ribblehead and have done the Three Peaks several times. It's about 26 miles with the three peaks of Whernside, Ingleborpugh and Pen-y-Gent. It's a tough walk which will probably take anything between 10 and 14 hours, so you need to choose your time and weather carefully. Each time I have done it I have started at Ribblehead doing Whernside first, then Ingleborough then Pen-y-Gent, although the most common starting point is Horton in Ribblesdale which has a pub and cafe where you can supposedly register for the walk, but I have never found open. There's not much else on the walk apart from the pub at Ribblehead. Navigation isn't a problem as the paths are well trodden, but you will need to have an OS map to check in a few places. All of the climbs are quite tough, but doable, the toughest probably the climb up Ingleborough, when approached from Whernside. The worst bit of it, undoubtedly, is the walk between Pen-y-Gent and Whernside which is not difficult but seems to go on forever, particularly if you're tired. It goes without saying that the weather can be miserable and unpredictable, so good gear, particularly boots is essential, with plenty of food and water.

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10 minutes ago, Large Frank said:

I live about 25 miles from Ribblehead and have done the Three Peaks several times. It's about 26 miles with the three peaks of Whernside, Ingleborpugh and Pen-y-Gent. It's a tough walk which will probably take anything between 10 and 14 hours, so you need to choose your time and weather carefully. Each time I have done it I have started at Ribblehead doing Whernside first, then Ingleborough then Pen-y-Gent, although the most common starting point is Horton in Ribblesdale which has a pub and cafe where you can supposedly register for the walk, but I have never found open. There's not much else on the walk apart from the pub at Ribblehead. Navigation isn't a problem as the paths are well trodden, but you will need to have an OS map to check in a few places. All of the climbs are quite tough, but doable, the toughest probably the climb up Ingleborough, when approached from Whernside. The worst bit of it, undoubtedly, is the walk between Pen-y-Gent and Whernside which is not difficult but seems to go on forever, particularly if you're tired. It goes without saying that the weather can be miserable and unpredictable, so good gear, particularly boots is essential, with plenty of food and water.

Thanks for this.

 

I had a mate tell me he had to climb up Ingleborough on his hands and knees so that sounds tough. Guessing you would recommend walking poles?

 

Good to know the paths are well trodden, I can't navigate using a map so unless someone else does this for me you will probably hear about me on the news.

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Posted (edited)

Wrong thread sorry


Edited by Strokes
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2 minutes ago, Strokes said:

If Corbyn party were behind him I think he would be quite credible, it's hard to dislike him, even if you don't agree with him. I'm a sucker for the mistreated underdog though.

Yeah but has he done the Yorkshire three peaks?

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1 minute ago, Izzy Muzzett said:

Yeah but has he done the Yorkshire three peaks?

willy puller lol 

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1 minute ago, Strokes said:

willy puller lol 

Corbyn defo couldn't lead a party up a mountain or three.

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47 minutes ago, Large Frank said:

I live about 25 miles from Ribblehead and have done the Three Peaks several times. It's about 26 miles with the three peaks of Whernside, Ingleborpugh and Pen-y-Gent. It's a tough walk which will probably take anything between 10 and 14 hours, so you need to choose your time and weather carefully. Each time I have done it I have started at Ribblehead doing Whernside first, then Ingleborough then Pen-y-Gent, although the most common starting point is Horton in Ribblesdale which has a pub and cafe where you can supposedly register for the walk, but I have never found open. There's not much else on the walk apart from the pub at Ribblehead. Navigation isn't a problem as the paths are well trodden, but you will need to have an OS map to check in a few places. All of the climbs are quite tough, but doable, the toughest probably the climb up Ingleborough, when approached from Whernside. The worst bit of it, undoubtedly, is the walk between Pen-y-Gent and Whernside which is not difficult but seems to go on forever, particularly if you're tired. It goes without saying that the weather can be miserable and unpredictable, so good gear, particularly boots is essential, with plenty of food and water.

 

Is Ingleborough the one that looks like a vertical climb as you approach it? 

 

I remember the climb of Pen-y-Gent being deceptive as hadn't done much hill walking before. Set off at too quick a pace and was breathing pretty heavily by the time we were near the top. 

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Posted (edited)

I've done two out of three, not Whernside.  Last time I went up Ingleborough past the caves, through Gaping Gill etc. the paths were well marked out.  Much easier since the first time I did it, paths were a mess.  Clearly spent a lot on maintaining the paths.

 

Blencathra is also an awesome hill climb.


Edited by Legend_in_blue
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Posted (edited)

19 hours ago, Costock_Fox said:

Thinking about doing the above, Has anyone on here done it? If so any tips/advice would be welcome.

Yeah, done it twice when I was younger. Both times I did Pen Y Ghent------Whernside-----Ingleborough.

Its a beautiful route. The trek back from Ingleborough to the village where you start (sorry, can't remember the name) takes forever though...

Do it, you'll enjoy it. Approx 26 miles I think.

Dont forget to take some warm clothing. Whernside in particular is almost always clouded in mist at the top and it gets bloody wet and cold.

Good luck.


Edited by Col city fan
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8 hours ago, syston_fox said:

 

Is Ingleborough the one that looks like a vertical climb as you approach it? 

 

I remember the climb of Pen-y-Gent being deceptive as hadn't done much hill walking before. Set off at too quick a pace and was breathing pretty heavily by the time we were near the top. 

Yes..Ingleborough is nearly vertical...

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Both Ingleborough and Pen-y-Gent have climbs which involve a bit of scrambling, although nothing too serious, but nonetheless strenuous. Previous comments about Whernside are correct, I've never known it not wet (or dry if you prefer). 

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It was a lovely day when I did it, which I'm sure helped.

 

Also had literally no sleep the night before thanks to the worst snoring I've ever heard from some pissed up geezer in the bunk above me in the youth hostel we stayed in

 

 

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Got stuck up to my waste in a bog which took two people to haul me out. 

 

I can can remember one was an absolute killer, the one by the viaduct I think, climbing the flagstones, step after step after step after step.........

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12 hours ago, Vlad the Fox said:

Got stuck up to my waste in a bog which took two people to haul me out. 

 

I can can remember one was an absolute killer, the one by the viaduct I think, climbing the flagstones, step after step after step after step.........

lol I remember that happening to someone on a school trip in the Derbyshire Dales.

 

 

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