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Coronavirus Thread

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23 hours ago, Will1981 said:

Just had my covid test at the Narborough walk in centre very quick and easy, now got to wait for the results.

Got my negative result this morning not got covid just a bad head cold.

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8 hours ago, NewEnglandFox said:

Got a JNJ today on my 2nd day of eligibility. I asked the pharmacist who gave me my shot if I had to walk around the store for 15 minutes and he reminded me that "this is America and you can do whatever you want." I went to my car, sent a couple texts, and was on my way. 8 hours in and doing great. I'm on such high from finishing my taxes and getting my shot that this made today better than any other in a long long time. Obviously I hope this one shot option is available to you filthy redcoat loyalists soon.

 

However I would like to say **** the media. Maine (my state) is 5th best in the % metrics. And I had no idea until 2 days ago and I watch the news most nights. Whatever hiccups we've had must be trivial. Stupid gloom and doom merchants. Looking at the stats I think there must be some advantages to being a less populous albeit rural state. Cases in Maine are rising and my county is one of the worst in both cases and vaccination rate in the state.

Good day for you! I slept well last night and feel infinitely better after the J&J. 
 

Movement on travel from the U.K. today is positive. Just need a reverse on the ban on the U.K. by US and my son can meet his family this Summer. Hopefully that’s announced this side soon.

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2 hours ago, st albans fox said:

Have there been many J&J jabs administered in Europe ??

I wouldn't say many but obviously they have started recently. Surprised they approved before the UK but I guess the UK mainly cared about the Astra Zeneca one.

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1 minute ago, KrefelderFox666 said:

I wouldn't say many but obviously they have started recently. Surprised they approved before the UK but I guess the UK mainly cared about the Astra Zeneca one.

The 4 clotting cases are in the states .....evidently no J&J in Europe as yet 

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Just seen that in Germany up to 2 April, there have been 42 potential cases of blood clots (from Astra Zeneca). The big stat is that all but 7 of them were in women aged between 20 and 63.

 

Stats over here didn't seem to show such a large tilt to females but there are obviously some genetics that come into play.

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1 hour ago, Mark 'expert' Lawrenson said:

Dangle the carrot of “normality” and then change the goalposts time and time again.

We’ve achieved our goals of saving the NHS and bringing deaths right down but they’ll scare the public with virus variants, the media do their scaremongering as per usual and we’ll find ourselves living under restrictions well after June 21st.

A lot of the public are so browbeaten that they’ll rejoice in even the slightest relaxation of “the rules” 

This 100%.

 

How many dangled carrots does it take? 

 

5 days at Christmas? 

 

Sacrifice Christmas to save Easter? 

 

Deluded. 

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28 minutes ago, st albans fox said:

@Line-X writes a great post but it may be too long and technical for a few who just want to have a pint down the pub and Facebook says it’s ok now to do that 

 

(over simplified but you get the gist) 

 

 

Science communication is a difficult art, yes.

 

It's tricky to strike a balance between communicating accurate information in a way as many people as possible will understand and avoiding reducing the technical detail to such a degree the message loses all meaning and/or can be misinterpreted.

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this is a country with 60% vaccination per 100 people (at leat one shot)

 

presumably an illustration of the effectiveness of the jabs wrt to the Brazil variant

 

the good news would be if the death rate remains flat and current numbers are encouraging in this regard in that they are increasing but not anything like the rate that cases have as they rose a few weeks ago ....

 


image.thumb.png.fbc6ba2793314a71cd1d7b45e0145674.png

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1 hour ago, st albans fox said:

this is a country with 60% vaccination per 100 people (at leat one shot)

 

presumably an illustration of the effectiveness of the jabs wrt to the Brazil variant

 

the good news would be if the death rate remains flat and current numbers are encouraging in this regard in that they are increasing but not anything like the rate that cases have as they rose a few weeks ago ....

 


image.thumb.png.fbc6ba2793314a71cd1d7b45e0145674.png

What does their hospital admissions/deaths look like? Not really useful with half the picture painted imo.

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2 hours ago, Line-X said:

They do indeed and I very much agree with what you are saying regarding browbeating the public. I consistently said that this 'roadmap' was unrealistic and way too optimistic. Regarding "the media" I would review your sources. From your posts, you're clearly an intelligent and discerning individual - however many that I observe on this thread complaining about media scaremongering are the ones continually reposting it along with sensationalised reactionary twitter feeds. Just ignore the popular press and balance the science itself at source.  

 

Regarding "our goals", remember this a a global crisis and we are still a long way from achieving them. As I was discussing last week, remember the objective is to corral and to eliminate covid where eradication is impossible. Think of Influenza A as an annual widespread slow burn, but SARS-CoV-2 is an incendiary firestorm in comparison. This is because it has a much lower 'K' factor (dispersion factor than the flu) meaning that a small number of cases are responsible for a large number of secondary cases. Now imagine a single fire crew attempting to protect a city against an invisible arsonist. A localised fire is started, then another, then another, then another and while they attempt to extinguish the first, the rest are spreading. Fortunately, as vaccination drives the R number down, we are more likely to encounter ever more isolated cases that can be rapidly quelled but this is why we need to guard against one big superspreading event such as an indoor concert arena or event which can quickly overwhelm a local healthcare trust. The "aim" is to get the rates as low as possible and if an outbreak occurs we stop it from spreading. The chief weapon of SARS-CoV-2 is asymptomatic spread. This is the fundamental difference between SARS-Cov-2 and the more serious SARS CoV in 2002 which was quickly tamed in comparison. 

 

In respect of the variants, again it comes down to containment. With almost every person it infects, the virus changes very subtly picking up a letter in its genetic code here, another being deleted there or exchanged for something different. These typically occur due to tiny errors as the virus takes over the cell's molecular machinery to replicate itself. Aside from enabling science to track the virus around the globe, most have negligible consequences, but occasionally a mutation takes place that alters how quickly the virus spreads, how infectious it might be or even the severity of the disease it causes. For example, the H69/V70 deletion of two key amino acids has been found modify the shape of the Covid-19 spike protein so that a loop of molecules that normally protrude from it are pulled in tighter. This is thought to be an adaptation by the virus as it tries to evade the immune system which increases the infectivity twofold. The 20A.EU1 mutation, more commonly known as the Spanish variant emerged and spread during a spate of foreign holidays as restrictions eased last summer. Research that has replicated some of the mutations found on the Brazialian P1 in viruses indicate that they might give the virus the ability to evade vaccine-induced immunity.

 

The mistake that people are making - in government rhetoric and not just simply public perception - is to overlook the dynamic and flux of the virus presenting/conceiving this as a national crisis, completely overlooking the wider global issue. This is a world war - and although we are nationally winning the battle, there is still a massive threat lurking overseas. This is a war that will eventually be won, the aim being to disarm the virus. Any subsequent pockets of resistance throughout the globe will then rapidly be circled and subdued.

 

The suggestion that we have already "achieved our goals" is the delusional part. 

Good post.

 

June 21st was always very optimistic in respect of full normality but if you are referring to the reopening plans prior to  that point I'd interested to know why you think they are unrealistic (if you do). Surely the lifting restrictions, including those on Monday and in mid May, strike a decent balance between being cautious and not unnecessarily locking down parts of society given the plummeting hospitalisation and death rate? If you dont, then ignore me!

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