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The "do they mean us?" thread pt 2

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37 minutes ago, Dahnsouff said:

 

Blimey, I don't normally bother with such things but that guy almost sounded like he knew what he was talking about! He needs to work on his proof reading though... Ndindi :unsure:

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5 hours ago, Markyblue said:

The posts after drinking are the staple diet of foxestalk and often the best.

I thank you sir. It all becomes clearer now ( well sort of ):D:thumbup:

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On 17/01/2020 at 12:59, mabrah said:

Blimey, I don't normally bother with such things but that guy almost sounded like he knew what he was talking about! He needs to work on his proof reading though... Ndindi :unsure:

Alongside his compatriot Ihenaccshio:D

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On 17/01/2020 at 16:28, TRAD-DAD said:

I thank you sir. It all becomes clearer now ( well sort of ):D:thumbup:

When you have been here for a while you will find out that some of @fuchsntf posts are legendary

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9 minutes ago, pds said:

Fixed

I’m not really sure they ever become legible. As such. We just become more adept at deciphering them. 

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8 hours ago, ARM1968 said:

I’m not really sure they ever become legible. As such. We just become more adept at deciphering them. 

I put it to you that they're all legible, but linguistically indecipherable. 

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Not necesarrily about us but it bloody well describes my experience as a Leicester fan:

 

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-51222376?ns_mchannel=social&ns_source=twitter&ocid=socialflow_twitter&ns_campaign=bbcnews

 

Devoted football fans experience 'dangerous' levels of stress

A fan cries after a Brazil defeatChris Brunskill Ltd/Getty Images Brazil fans were emotional following their country's defeat to Germany in 2014

Devoted football fans experience such intense levels of physical stress while watching their team they could be putting themselves at risk of a heart attack, research suggests.

The Oxford study tested saliva from Brazilian fans during their historic loss to Germany at the 2014 World Cup.

It found levels of the hormone cortisol rocketed during the 7-1 home defeat in the semi-final.

This can be dangerous, increasing blood pressure and strain on the heart. 

The researchers found no difference in stress levels between men and women during the game, despite preconceptions men are more "bonded to their football teams".

Impending doom

"Fans who are strongly fused with their team - that is, have a strong sense of being 'one' with their team - experience the greatest physiological stress response when watching a match," said Dr Martha Newson, researcher at the Centre for the Study of Social Cohesion, at Oxford. 

"Fans who are more casual supporters also experience stress but not so extremely."

Prolonged high levels of cortisol can:

  • constrict blood vessels
  • raise blood pressure 
  • damage an already weakened heart

Raised cortisol can also give people a feeling of impending doom, that their life is in danger or they are under attack.

Previous research has shown an increase in heart attacks among fans on important match days, whether supporting club or country.

Harrowing match

In their study, the University of Oxford researchers tracked cortisol levels in 40 fans' saliva before, during and after three World Cup matches.

Fans can't look during Brazil's loss to Germany at the 2014 World CupGetty Images Some stressed-out fans couldn't event watch...

The most stressful by far was the semi-final.

"It was a harrowing match - so many people stormed out sobbing," Dr Newson told BBC News.

But the fans had used coping strategies such as humour and hugging to reduce their stress, bringing it down to pre-match levels by the final whistle.

Dr Newson suggested stadiums should dim the lights and play calming music after games.

"Clubs may be able to offer heart screenings or other health measures to highly committed fans who are at the greatest risk of experiencing increased stress during the game," she added.

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2 hours ago, Steven said:

Not so much nowadays I have to say. :brendan_still:

mine peaked after the Watford playoff. said i can't get that stressed out anymore after that and reeled it in. Atleti and the first Liverpool game and Everton when we scored the last minute ones have been close. Wasn't even stressed in the great escape as i knew we were good enough to stay up. 

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18 hours ago, ARM1968 said:

I’m not really sure they ever become legible. As such. We just become more adept at deciphering them. 

Once you have mastered that...It proves you are ready for the Next phase... Aztec & Egyptian hieroglyphics....that would be then par " fuchsntf"

I See some are Catching me up,and I can start slowly on the forum's re-education....Not forgetting obviously the 4 classical European languages to boot..!!:scarf:

 

Just because I prefer to use..Anglo-Saxon-Norman mix, with a Twist of Good ol' Pagan grammer,

some of You seem to  struggle..oh well...C'est Le vie !..asi es l vida!  oder. So ist das leben...s°ant a°r livet ...:D

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16 hours ago, fuchsntf said:

Once you have mastered that...It proves you are ready for the Next phase... Aztec & Egyptian hieroglyphics....that would be then par " fuchsntf"

I See some are Catching me up,and I can start slowly on the forum's re-education....Not forgetting obviously the 4 classical European languages to boot..!!:scarf:

 

Just because I prefer to use..Anglo-Saxon-Norman mix, with a Twist of Good ol' Pagan grammer,

some of You seem to  struggle..oh well...C'est Le vie !..asi es l vida!  oder. So ist das leben...s°ant a°r livet ...:D

Easy for you to say. 

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On 24/01/2020 at 07:25, HighPeakFox said:

I put it to you that they're all legible, but linguistically indecipherable. 

I can run with that and you are correct. 

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On 24/01/2020 at 08:25, HighPeakFox said:

I put it to you that they're all legible, but linguistically indecipherable. 

Thats more like a lowpeakmongrel,Not the thoughtfull highpeakfox...

you have to understand,I had to undecipher und Translate everytime from my New Parks English,with a Bland road twist before I even start....!!!...:o

 

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3 hours ago, fuchsntf said:

Thats more like a lowpeakmongrel,Not the thoughtfull highpeakfox...

you have to understand,I had to undecipher und Translate everytime from my New Parks English,with a Bland road twist before I even start....!!!...:o

 

I admit to being a mongrel, strictly speaking. But you are sometimes difficult to comprehend. 

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23 hours ago, Out Foxed said:

mine peaked after the Watford playoff. said i can't get that stressed out anymore after that and reeled it in. Atleti and the first Liverpool game and Everton when we scored the last minute ones have been close. Wasn't even stressed in the great escape as i knew we were good enough to stay up. 

that watford game man, i couldn't eat or sleep for days 

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The thing about the Watford game was that it felt like that was our chance gone and we'd be stuck in the championship for years, doing what Birmingham or Derby have been doing for the past 6 years. Was glad to stand corrected the following season.

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6 hours ago, HighPeakFox said:

I admit to being a mongrel, strictly speaking. But you are sometimes difficult to comprehend. 

But..I do write the right words.....

 

 

 

but Not necessarily in the right order...:P

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6 hours ago, HighPeakFox said:

I admit to being a mongrel, strictly speaking. But you are sometimes difficult to comprehend. 

I honestly thought I was the only one. Never seen anyone else mention it and I wasn't going to be the first. It's odd, because I understand like 98% of all the words he writes, it just doesn't seem to fall into place. 

 

Still, seems like a chill guy and most of the time he seems in good spirits, which automatically makes his posts better to read than the moaners. :D

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18 hours ago, Innovindil said:

I honestly thought I was the only one. Never seen anyone else mention it and I wasn't going to be the first. It's odd, because I understand like 98% of all the words he writes, it just doesn't seem to fall into place. 

 

Still, seems like a chill guy and most of the time he seems in good spirits, which automatically makes his posts better to read than the moaners. :D

I'll see you get mentioned in dispatches, and be up ASAP for a Blue Peter badge..!!!     

 

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/50827313

 

BBC bigging our Wilfred up this morning.  

Wilfed Ndidi: Leicester midfielder rising above N'Golo Kante comparisons

Wilfred Ndidi has probably got a little tired of hearing N'Golo Kante's name over the past couple of years.

After all, since the 22-year-old defensive midfielder joined Leicester in January 2017 he has regularly found himself compared to the Chelsea midfielder, who was an instrumental part of the Foxes' title-winning team in 2015-16.

But maybe now is the time for the comparisons to stop.

Ndidi is not just filling the void left by Kante, he has developed into one of the best players in his position and is arguably the fulcrum in a Leicester team that is fighting for a top-four finish in the Premier League and at one stage looked like battling with Liverpool for top spot.

It is also probably no coincidence that Leicester's title challenge - admittedly unlikely against an imperious Liverpool side - faded when Ndidi suffered an injury in early January.

His return is significant for the Foxes, who beat West Ham 4-1 on his comeback last week to end a three-game winless run, and who face Aston Villa in the second leg of their Carabao Cup semi-final on Tuesday with the tie level at 1-1.

So how did Ndidi develop into one of the best defensive midfielders in Europe? It all started with a ball made of Sellotape...

Makeshift footballs and strict discipline - where it all began

There is something simplistic yet regimented about Ndidi's role on the pitch - break up attacks, win back possession and pass. Rinse and repeat.

The type of footballer he is can perhaps be traced back to his upbringing.

Born in 1996 to a military father, Ndidi grew up in a Lagos barracks. Discipline and education were the priority while football was a passion his father frowned upon.

"Any time my dad went to work I would go and play," Ndidi said in an interview with BBC World Service.

"I would then get the signal that he was coming and go back to what I was doing, so he didn't know I'd been playing. I got caught several times but was still going. I love football. I just want to play."

While many of his Leicester team-mates started their careers in the academies of professional football clubs, Ndidi's football education came on the roads around the military barracks he grew up in.

"We would wrap sheets of papers up and using Sellotape make it into a ball," he adds. "There was no money to buy footballs.

"We played on the main road, using two tyres as goals. The big guys were using the good pitch, we had nothing to use and just played on the road."

It was during these formative years that Ndidi came across a person who he credits as one of the most influential in his career.

 

Coaching the army barracks youth team was former Nigeria international Nduka Ugbade, a tough disciplinarian who pushed the young players to their limits both physically and mentally.

"Ugbade is one of the biggest names in African football," Africa-based sports journalist Oluwashina Okeleji tells BBC Sport.

"His opinion is respected and if he speaks to you, you listen. There is no limit with him. No excuses. He is a hard trainer but will not stretch you beyond your ability."

Still, the tough training was too much for some but, as a skinny teenager who was also smaller than his peers, Ndidi felt such a work ethic would benefit him.

'Take the ball and pass' - keeping it simple pays dividends

The discipline he developed from being coached by Ugbade meant he treated every game equally - competitive or friendly - and his big chance to impress the wider world came in a tournament in Nigeria, where international scouts were watching.

"There were about 40 teams that came for the tournament," says Ndidi. "I got the ball and made a run, a one-two run into the middle. I gave a simple pass to the striker. No-one had seen him so I just gave it to him between the defenders and he went and scored. That was the only game I played."

For Roland Janssen, a Genk scout at the tournament, that one game was enough. Impressed with the teenager's work rate he invited Ndidi for a trial with the Belgian side.

"When I came to Belgium the coach was Alex McLeish and he was putting me at right-back and left-back," Ndidi continues.

"Then a new coach came in and put me in midfield but it was so strange because the first game I played there I was substituted in the 32nd minute.

"After that I went back to basics - take the ball, look around, pass, take the ball, look around, pass."

'Kante is brilliant but there's no-one better than Ndidi'

Keeping it simple has undoubtedly worked wonders for Ndidi and statistically he is now one of the best players in his position.

Such is his influence that when he missed three games this month for Leicester through injury, the Foxes failed to win any of them.

He missed two Premier League matches during that spell on the sidelines yet still tops the table for most tackles made in the top flight. And by some distance.

Most tackles in the Premier League (midfielders)  
Player Tackles
Wilfred Ndidi (Leicester) 86
Joao Moutinho (Wolves) 65
James Ward-Prowse (Southampton) 62
Emiliano Buendia (Norwich) 57
Pierre-Emile Hojbjerg (Southampton) 57

"I think he is the best in the Premier League at tackling and winning the ball back," Ndidi's team-mate James Maddison told BBC Radio 5 Live's Football Daily podcast.

"Kante is a brilliant player but actually winning the ball back and taking the ball off the opposition I don't think there is anyone better than Wilfred.

"Sometimes you get a player like that and what he does doesn't get talked about on the back pages, it doesn't maybe get talked about on Match of the Day.

"However, us as team-mates know what he does and it lets players like myself and Youri Tielemans do our thing higher up the pitch because we know we have that solidarity behind us."

Stopping attacks while studying at university

Nigerian midfielder Wilfred Ndidi on why he's studying business at University.

Ndidi's statistics are all the more impressive when you consider he is combining being the best defensive midfielder in Europe with studying for a degree.

Having found himself with plenty of spare time after training, Ndidi last year enrolled onto a business management course at De Montfort University in Leicester.

"It is easy to get carried away with the bright lights of the big cities when you move to England, but that's not Ndidi," continues Okeleji.

"He is learning how to invest his money properly. Legends of the game have struggled in Africa after their playing careers have come to an end.

"Instead of going home and watching films he wanted to do something productive with his time.

"He may sometimes play PlayStation with his friends but otherwise it is just about football and studying."

'He wants to be his own man'

It takes a lot to frustrate Ndidi, described by those who see him behind the scenes at Leicester as one of the most laid-back players at the club.

At Genk, he was nicknamed Teddy Bear because of his calm demeanour and ability to take being the butt of some of the team's jokes in good humour.

But comparisons with Kante are one thing he struggles to smile about.

"Any time someone mentions it to him it does upset him a bit," adds Okeleji.

"There is obviously great respect there but now he wants to be his own man. He feels he has established himself in his own right."

image.gif

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No wonder this country performs so badly in Footballing Comps when the media are spouting nonsense like this.

Number of tackles = Must be a Anchor Man = Kante was an Anchor man

 

Look at the table ffs.....

 

Wilfred Ndidi (Leicester) 86
Joao Moutinho (Wolves) 65
James Ward-Prowse (Southampton) 62
Emiliano Buendia (Norwich) 57
Pierre-Emile Hojbjerg (Southampton) 57

 

Ndidi is the only one of the above 5 which is a out and out Anchor man, the Makelele role if you will.

None of the above besides him plays that role, and neither does Kante, who was never the deepest center mid here, or at Chelsea.

 

In fact, you're then actually massively downplaying the most impressive name on that list, Emiliano Buendia. 

4th most tackles in the league, and 3rd most assists? There's a signing i'd be after in the summer.

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